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Through classes, group learning and field trips to computational research centers, you will gain the experience necessary to not only succeed, but to excel in college-level science, engineering and mathematics.

Governor's School for Computational Physics

Through classes, group learning and field trips to computational research centers, you will gain the experience necessary to not only succeed, but to excel in college-level science, engineering and mathematics.

Sometimes, we break things.

Don't worry though, we only break produce after it has been super-chilled in a liquid nitrogen bath. Or balloons we push just a little too close to a tesla coil. 

Every time we break something, it's an opportunity to learn more about the world around us and how things work together. And that's exactly what students in the Governor's School for Computational Physics get to do every day with our interactive summer curriculum. In a nutshell: Computational physics will allow you to tackle realistic problems in practically every field of science and engineering.

We are currently accepting applications for next summer's Governor's School program. Check out the important dates below and application information before the first deadline on December 1. 

 

 

4
Hours of College credit
3
Weeks of daily programming and field trips
$0
Admission is free with eligible applications
Deborah Gulledge
Deborah Gulledge
APSU Physics major

Before I attended The Governor’s School for Computational Physics, I planned to be an English major. But during the program, I learned I loved problem solving, and rediscovered the passion for science and space I had as a child. Now I'm on track to get my Ph.D. in Astronomy, a path I never would have gone down without the amazing experiences I had at Gov School and APSU.

 

Governor's School student plays with non-newtonian fluid

Students walk on water during Governor's School

Non-Newtonian fluid makes liquid, solid surface

Last week, Bryan Gaither’s grocery list called for 150 pounds of cornstarch. When asked what he was doing, the Austin Peay State University physics lab manager explained he wanted to get a group of campers to walk on water.

“We’re making what’s called a non-Newtonian fluid, where the particles lock together when you add force to them,” he said.