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APSU grad student publishes paper on entrepreneurs and HR practices

           CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. – The astounding success of some startup companies, such as Pandora and Uber, can sometimes blind young entrepreneurs to the fact that 90 percent of these ventures end up failing. Every time a company like Snapchat comes on the scene, plenty of others—remember Cuil or Spiralfrog?—quietly disappear.

           CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. – The astounding success of some startup companies, such as Pandora and Uber, can sometimes blind young entrepreneurs to the fact that 90 percent of these ventures end up failing. Every time a company like Snapchat comes on the scene, plenty of others—remember Cuil or Spiralfrog?—quietly disappear.

            With the sudden boost technological advances have given to America’s entrepreneurial spirit, young business men and women are wondering what they can do to make sure their startup survives and thrives. Ty Jesinoski, a recent graduate of Austin Peay State University’s Master of Science in Management program, believes he knows part of the formula for success. In a recent article Jesinoski co-authored and had published in “The Business Journal for Entrepreneurs,” he argues that successful startups do what most major companies do—they invest in Human Resource Management.

            “I looked at everything about human resources, from staffing to hiring and firing, managing benefits, anything you can think of HR-wise, and then how entrepreneurs and startups, with only one or two people, handled that themselves,” Jesinoski said. “To be an entrepreneur, you need to be a jack-of-all-trades, you need to be a people person and know how to hire and how to network.”

            Jesinoski developed his initial concept for the article last spring while taking a graduate management class taught by Dr. Gloria Miller, APSU assistant professor of business. A major component of that class was the development of a research paper on a topic of the student’s choice. When Miller read Jesinoski’s paper, she felt it had potential beyond the classroom.

            “When I read Ty’s paper as submitted to the class, it was well written, clear, with minimal writing errors,” Miller said. “The real decision-maker, though, was that Ty thought beyond the textbook. He brought together three topics in an innovative paper, which I thought was interesting and would be worth working together to get published to share with others.”

            For the next several months, Jesinoski worked with Miller and Dr. John Volker, APSU professor of business, on expanding his paper into a publishable article. 

            “They butchered it, said I needed to make it longer, find scholarly sources, tweak things here and there,” Jesinoski said. “Then we worked on it for two or three months, did a few rough drafts back and forth.”

            By the end of the summer, a final draft—with Jesinoski, Miller and Volker listed as authors—was submitted to a scholarly business journal. In December, shortly before Jesinoski graduated, the Business Journal for Entrepreneurs published, “Entrepreneurial Human Relations and Organizational Behavior.” For Jesinoski, this type of experience was one of the reasons why he enrolled in APSU’s Master of Science in Management program.

            “I compared the MSM to the MBA, and for an MBA, you have to have a ton of work experience,” he said. “The MSM is more for people who don’t work in the business field, but want to broaden their scope. It taught me a lot. I felt it was the right amount of challenge and support.”

            For more information on APSU’s Master of Science in Management program, visit https://www.apsu.edu/grad-studies/management.