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Writer for "The New Yorker" to visit Austin Peay

October 14, 2003

The Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts presents one of Americas finest writers of nonfiction, Bryan DiSalvatore, as part of its Visiting Writers Series.

DiSalvatore's reading will begin at 8 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 11 in the Gentry Auditorium of APSUs Kimbrough Building.

DiSalvatore initially gained national attention for a piece inspired by watching the World Series with his losing softball team.
October 14, 2003

The Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts presents “one of America's finest writers of nonfiction,” Bryan DiSalvatore, as part of its Visiting Writers Series.

DiSalvatore's reading will begin at 8 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 11 in the Gentry Auditorium of APSU's Kimbrough Building.

DiSalvatore initially gained national attention for a piece inspired by watching the World Series with his losing softball team.

“I'd broken up with my girlfriend …I didn't have the rent, baseball season was over and I was standing there doing the dishes,” DiSalvatore says. “I literally left the …dishes in the sink, and I went down and typed up …a mock-heroic story about our softball team rooting for Kansas City, because we'd had a bad year and they were the underdogs. I sent it to [the editor of ‘The New Yorker'], and he called and said, ‘I'd like to run this, and I'd like you to come out to New York and be our guest.'”

An avid outdoorsman, baseball fan and movie watcher, DiSalvatore went on to address topics ranging from the Mariana Trench to Merle Haggard. His essays and articles have been published in a number of magazines, including, of course, “The New Yorker,” for which he has been writing since 1987.

DiSalvatore's two books, “A Clever Baseballist: The Life and Times of John Montgomery Ward” and “Truck Driver,” visit worlds unknown to most readers. Determined to capture the truth, research for the latter called for countless hours at the side of a long-distance truck driver.

“[P]assion bleeds from the work of Bryan DiSalvatore,” says Nick Davis of the Missoula Independent.
Terry Stringer