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Winners of composer's competition announced

Winners in the 2008 Young Composers Competition were announced recently by the Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University.

First prize was awarded to Andrew Allen, of Rochester, N.Y., for his Breakbeat Mechanima for chamber ensemble. Second place was awarded to Lauren Wells, of Kansas City, Mo., for her sonata for cello and piano. Third prize was awarded to Justin Hoke, of Lancaster, Pa., for his Lacuna for chamber ensemble.
Winners in the 2008 Young Composer's Competition were announced recently by the Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts at Austin Peay State University.

First prize was awarded to Andrew Allen, of Rochester, N.Y., for his “Breakbeat Mechanima” for chamber ensemble. Second place was awarded to Lauren Wells, of Kansas City, Mo., for her sonata for cello and piano. Third prize was awarded to Justin Hoke, of Lancaster, Pa., for his “Lacuna” for chamber ensemble.

Allen's works have been premiered throughout the eastern U.S. and Europe, with scheduled 2008 premieres in Hong Kong. He has written for most major types of ensembles, including orchestras, wind ensembles, electric guitars, string quartet, sax quartet, solo piano, piano trio, rock band, voice, electronic and electroacoustic ensembles, percussion ensembles and Pierrot ensemble.

In addition to winning this year's competition, Allen has received other local and international recognition. His “Reflections of a Lowcountry Marshland” for carillon recently was added to the Berkeley School of Music Library Archive. He was selected as a recipient of the 2006-07 Magellan Scholarship for research in interactive computer music and cellular automata, which resulted in multiple concerts and live installations of new computer music in the spring of 2007.

Allen holds a formal degree from the University of South Carolina, where he studied under John Fitz Rogers in acoustic composition and Reginald Bain in computer music. He currently attends the Eastman School of Music where he also works as a teaching assistant and webmaster for the Eastman Computer Music Center as well as a board member and webmaster of Eastman's student-run new music ensemble, Ossia. He currently studies composition under Robert D. Morris.

Wells currently is pursuing a Bachelor of Music in composition from the University of Missouri-Kansas City Conservatory of Music and Dance. She has studied composition with James Mobberley, Chen Yi and Paul Rudy. Recent performances of her work include the Electronic Music Midwest 2007 conference and the April 2008 Composers' Guild concert at UMKC. She is a member of the Kansas City Electronic Music Alliance, which hosts unique collaborative performances at art galleries around the city.

Hoke currently is pursuing a B.M. degree from the Eastman School of Music. His composition teachers have included John Carbon, Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez and David Liptak and currently Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon. Studying piano since the age of 5, he has been a student of Joann Wagstaff, Elizabeth Keller and presently works with Tony Caramia. Hoke's piece, “Che si sgretola,” received a BMI Student Composer Award in May 2008. Also this year, he received the Bernard Rogers Memorial Prize from the Eastman School of Music.

The Austin Peay State University Young Composers Competition has been held annually since 1987. Since becoming a national competition in 1993, the APSU Department of Music and the Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts have awarded prizes to composers from such prestigious musical institutions such as Peabody Conservatory of Music, Harvard University, Yale University, the Cleveland Institute, New York University and the Eastman School of Music.

Its purpose is to encourage young composers by providing professional-level performances of their music as well as financial incentive and support. Those composers winning ?rst prize are traditionally invited to the APSU campus for the performance of their music, a vitally important facet of the competition. While here, these young composers interact with both undergraduate and graduate students in composition and theory, talking to classes and meeting with composition students.

The competition was open to student composers who were citizens or permanent residents of the U.S., enrolled in accredited public, private or parochial secondary schools, in accredited colleges or conservatories of music or engaged in the private study of music with recognized and established teachers. A panel chosen from qualified university faculty and composers served as judges. -- Melony Shemberger