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This Week in Higher Ed

•Trustees of the College Board voted unanimously to continue to use the PSAT as the qualifying exam for the National Merit Scholarship Program, despite criticism that using the practice test for the SAT to pick winners is unfair. Critics said using the test in the selection process for National Merit Scholars harms the poor and racial minorities, who on average score lower than whites on standardized tests. (Associated Press, 3/28/05)
•Trustees of the College Board voted unanimously to continue to use the PSAT as the qualifying exam for the National Merit Scholarship Program, despite criticism that using the practice test for the SAT to pick winners is unfair. Critics said using the test in the selection process for National Merit Scholars harms the poor and racial minorities, who on average score lower than whites on standardized tests. (Associated Press, 3/28/05)

•A white woman with a bachelor's degree typically earned $37,800 in 2003, compared with $43,700 for a college-educated Asian woman and $41,100 for a black woman, according to data released Monday by the Census Bureau. Hispanic women took home $37,600 a year. The bureau did not say why the differences exist. Economists and sociologists suggest several possible factors: the tendency of minority women, especially blacks, to more often hold more than one job or work more than 40 hours a week, and the tendency of black professional women who take time off to have a child to return to the work force sooner than others. (New York Times/Associated Press, 3/28/05)

•New York University beat Harvard as the top “dream college” for a second straight year, leading a survey of U.S. students who increasingly are applying to urban schools, according to The Princeton Review. (Bloomberg.com, 3/24/05)

•The civil suit involving Daniel Moore and his alma mater, the University of Alabama, includes claims and countersuits that have polarized Crimson Tide fans into choosing either their favorite athletic program or one of its most famous advocates. The university filed a suit against Moore on behalf of its board of trustees and President Robert Witt asking that Moore license his paintings of memorable Crimson Tide athletic events through the university. (Montgomery Advertiser, 3/24/05)

•Two brothers who ran a Dallas degree mill that awarded a master's degree to a cat were ordered to pay more than $100,000 in fines. (Star-Telegram, 3/22/05)

•Asian American students have higher average SAT scores than any other government-monitored ethnic group, and selective colleges routinely reject them in favor of African American, Hispanic and even white applicants with lower scores in order to have more diverse campuses and make up for past discrimination. (The Washington Post, 3/22/05)

•Stephens College is leading the national movement to allow pets in dorms. School officials say pets lower stress levels and can ease the transition from home to college life. (The Christian Science Monitor, 3/16/05)

•Harvard is proposing to require all undergraduates to have a “significant” overseas experience, be it work, research or study. (The Christian Science Monitor, 3/15/05)