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This week in higher ed

•In order to lure top students, more public universities are developing honors colleges that advertise the cozy qualities of a liberal arts college–smaller classes, priority scheduling, research opportunities and special housing. (CNN, 10/11/04)
•In order to lure top students, more public universities are developing honors colleges that advertise the “cozy qualities” of a liberal arts college—smaller classes, priority scheduling, research opportunities and special housing. (CNN, 10/11/04)

•This month has been deadly for binge-drinking college students. Five underclassmen in four states appear to have drunk themselves to death, after friends sent them to bed, assuming they would “sleep it off.” Some college presidents are promising to crack down on underage drinking. Others have shut down fraternity houses. (USA Today, 10/8/04)

•A draft policy at the University of Oregon would give the university the power to require students who clearly threaten suicide to get help or be removed from school. (The Oregonian, 10/6/04)

•Florida Gulf Coast University opened in 1997 with the promise of tenure to lure new faculty, but its tenure system soon was replaced with fixed-term, multi-year contracts. Now that system is being replaced by a rolling contract that operates on a three-year cycle. (Bonita Daily News, 10/5/04)

•With the economy stuck in neutral, more students are gravitating toward highly specialized new majors, hoping the will give them an edge. Popular choices include sports sales, video-game development, casino studies and homeland security. (The Christian Science Monitor, 10/5/04)

•Five years after Massachusetts Institute of Technology admitted it had discriminated against female scientists, it prepares to welcome a new president, Yale Provost Susan Hockfield, a renowned neuroscientist. At Yale, Hockfield boosted grad students' base stipend by 50 percent and gave them free health care, beefed up minority outreach and pressed to hire more women. (BusinessWeek Online, 10/5/04)

•Something new is sweeping college dorms across America: LaundryView. The technology allows students to monitor their laundry online and be notified via e-mail, pagers or cell phones when their washing is finished. (USA Today, 10/7/04)