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This week in higher ed

•Emory University is using an online screening program to identify depressed students and prevent suicides. A clinical social worker sends an Are you depressed? e-mail to every undergraduate once a year and chats online with anyone who responds, preserving his or her anonymity. The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill has started sending seniors e-mails urging them to take an online mental health screening test. (USA Today)
•Emory University is using an online screening program to identify depressed students and prevent suicides. A clinical social worker sends an “Are you depressed?” e-mail to every undergraduate once a year and chats online with anyone who responds, preserving his or her anonymity. The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill has started sending seniors e-mails urging them to take an online mental health screening test. (USA Today)

•Shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc., a for-profit college operator, fell more than 2 percent after news that a former student was suing the company and seeking class-action status. A former Florida Metropolitan University student filed suit March 1 against the school and its parent companies—Corinthian Colleges and Rhodes Colleges Inc.—claiming she was misled about the ability to transfer credits. (Forbes)

•Brown University President Ruth Simmons has established a committee to examine the Ivy League school's historical ties to slavery and debate whether the university should make amends. (NBC 10-Providence)

•Next fall, the University of Texas at Austin will offer special services focused on helping former drug and alcohol addicts stay sober and stay in school. UTA will open its Center for Students in Recovery and provide a three-credit hour course titled “Complete Recovery 101.” (The Boston Globe)

•Next fall, the University of Kentucky's freshman class could reach an all-time high of 4,000 students. The school is planning a new winter term to help accommodate them. The winter term will offer 10-15 condensed courses during the three weeks between the fall and spring semesters. Students would be limited to one course, and classes wouldn't be held the week between Christmas and New Year's. (Lexington Herald-Leader)

•Roughly 16,000 Kentucky college students could lose state scholarship money next year. Lawmakers hope that by making Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarships more selective, they will ward off a $5 million shortfall predicted for 2006. (Lexington Herald-Leader)

•Officials at the University of Georgia and Georgia State University say they will be forced to raise tuition by at least 10 percent next year to make up for expected cuts in state funding. (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

•Northern Kentucky University President James Votruba is lobbying the federal government to consider funding university workforce development programs. (The Cincinnati Post)