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This week in higher ed

•New York University suffered its seventh suicide in a year as a 23-year-old graduate film student fell from the roof of the Tisch School of the Arts. (The New York Times, 9/7/04)

•Stephens College has designated the first floor of its Prunty Hall as a pet-friendly dorm wing for dogs, cats and rabbits. (Associated Press, 9/3/04)

•Columbia College President Gerald Brouder is refusing to forward a proposal to provide domestic partner benefits for employees to the institutions governing board. (Kansas City Star, 9/2/04)
•New York University suffered its seventh suicide in a year as a 23-year-old graduate film student fell from the roof of the Tisch School of the Arts. (The New York Times, 9/7/04)

•Stephens College has designated the first floor of its Prunty Hall as a pet-friendly dorm wing for dogs, cats and rabbits. (Associated Press, 9/3/04)

•Columbia College President Gerald Brouder is refusing to forward a proposal to provide domestic partner benefits for employees to the institution's governing board. (Kansas City Star, 9/2/04)

•Public colleges nationwide increasingly are offering courses and majors on casinos and gambling as states turn to casinos for gambling revenues. Courses include the study of gambling laws, operating on sovereign Indian land and biometrics and “facial recognition” for casino security. (Associated Press, 9/2/04)

•The Utah Supreme Court is debating whether the University of Utah has the right to continue its decades-old campus gun ban. The Legislature recently gained sole authority to regulate gun rights statewide and forbade public school districts, public schools or state universities to enact on-campus gun bans. (Daily Herald, 9/1/04)

•Three years after 9/11, colleges still are rushing to create counterterrorism and homeland security courses. Thousands of students in New York and elsewhere are pursuing degrees in that area, making disaster one of the fastest-growing fields in academia. (New York Times, 9/1/04)

•Homeland Security officials say SEVIS, the year-old Web-based system that tracks foreign students at U.S. universities and colleges, has led to 187 arrests. (Federal Computer Week, 8/31/04)