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This week in higher ed

•According to the American Association of University Professors, full-time tenured professors are going the way of the dodo. Instead, universities are hiring part-time professors who often teach at several institutions. In 1987, 67 percent of faculty were full time, and 58 percent of those had tenure. By 2001-02, 55 percent were full time, with 45 percent tenured. (The Christian Science Monitor)
•According to the American Association of University Professors, full-time tenured professors are going the way of the dodo. Instead, universities are hiring part-time professors who often teach at several institutions. In 1987, 67 percent of faculty were full time, and 58 percent of those had tenure. By 2001-02, 55 percent were full time, with 45 percent tenured. (The Christian Science Monitor)

•A federal judge has ruled that Virginia's colleges and universities can deny admission to illegal immigrants—the first ruling of its kind in the nation. Earlier last month, the Virginia House of Delegates passed a bill prohibiting admission of illegal immigrants. The bill is pending in the state Senate. The Virginia rulings counter a national trend in which seven states have allowed illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition rates at public colleges. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1982 that illegal immigrants are entitled to a primary and secondary education but has been silent on higher education. (The Washington Post)

•The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that students studying for the ministry can be denied scholarships funded by state tax dollars. By a 7-2 vote, the court said Washington state's Promise Scholarship Program, which permits any course of study except pastoral training, is not discriminatory. (The Seattle Times)

•For the first time in the university's history, the University of California will not admit every eligible freshman at one of its nine campuses. Instead, the excess qualified students (about 3,200) will be invited to attend a community college their first two years, with a guaranteed transfer to a specific UC campus as juniors if they complete the required coursework. Pending legislative approval, community college fees for those students would be waived. The California State University system will follow suit, admitting 4,200 fewer freshmen. (Sacramento Bee)

•CNN reports that “the latest craze sweeping American colleges” is rioting. Students nationwide have caused hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages during alcohol-fueled riots following major sporting events. For the full article, visit http://www.cnn.com/2004/EDUCATION/02/26/life.rioting.reut/index.html.

•Harvard University is guaranteeing that households earning less than $40,000 annually won't have to pay for their children's education at the school, whose administrators plan to reach out to more students from low and moderate-income families. Harvard also will reduce the contributions of families earning between $40,000 and $60,000. (The Boston Globe)