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Program offers African-American high schoolers a chance to be ‘ASTAR'

April 22, 2003

Building on the success of the inaugural program last year, this summer Austin Peay will provide African-American high school students with a glimpse into university life.

Coordinated by Darolyn Porter, program administrator, and funded with money from the Geier Consent Decree, the ASTAR Program will be held on campus July 13-19.

Approximately 120 students from Montgomery, Robertson, Dickson, Houston, Stewart and Cheatham counties will be accepted into the 2003 ASTAR Program.
April 22, 2003

Building on the success of the inaugural program last year, this summer Austin Peay will provide African-American high school students with a glimpse into university life.

Coordinated by Darolyn Porter, program administrator, and funded with money from the Geier Consent Decree, the ASTAR Program will be held on campus July 13-19.

Approximately 120 students from Montgomery, Robertson, Dickson, Houston, Stewart and Cheatham counties will be accepted into the 2003 ASTAR Program.

ASTAR, which is an acronym for “African-American ScholarsTalented, Asserting, Rising,” is designed to bring high school students to the APSU campus for a week of educational activities and a look at college life. Ninth-graders will attend a day camp, while participants in grades 10, 11 and 12 will live in a residence hall. All ASTAR participants will take some college courses, attend cultural events, get acquainted with college entrance exams, explore college options and meet faculty, staff and community leaders.

ASTAR staff will hold workshops to help participants identify their strengths. Students also will explore career possibilities and participate in events that build leadership skills and self-confidence.

Participants will be introduced to various academic disciplines, such as math, science, psychology, sociology, communication, speech, writing and African-American studies. They will learn about the skills needed to become successful in college, and they will be exposed to African-American faculty. They also are expected to learn to appreciate the importance of higher education and understand the relationship between cultural awareness and academic success.

Porter said, “My goal is for the participants to leave excited and motivated to have the kind of high school experience that will enable them to be well prepared for college. This pre-collegiate experience will provide exposure to college life in a way that should be helpful to them as they make decisions about what college to attend.”

African-American high school students who will enter the ninth, 10th, 11th or 12th grade in the fall and who have an interest in being a part of ASTAR need to apply before May 9, 2003.

For more information, telephone 6100.