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Trevor Law has a lot to say.

Previously, only the college student's friends got to hear his rants.
Today, as a panelist of a weekly live debate show on the Austin Peay State University television station, the sophomore political science major has a much wider audience.

The college's television station airing on Charter Communication cable Channel 99 is offering students like Law some real-world experience as well as a little fun.
Trevor Law has a lot to say.

Previously, only the college student's friends got to hear his rants.
Today, as a panelist of a weekly live debate show on the Austin Peay State University television station, the sophomore political science major has a much wider audience.

The college's television station airing on Charter Communication cable Channel 99 is offering students like Law some real-world experience as well as a little fun.

"Scrambled Eggs" features Law and three other panelists led by a host, debating a variety of topics ranging from local campus issues to global politics. During the 30-minute show, the panelists are awarded points for well-made arguments. The winner gets one minute at the end of the show to talk about a topic of his or her choice.

The show ranges from light-hearted humor to passionate and heated debates. One recent show featured the panelists debating abortion, an APSU dorm's lack of heat, a controversial judge, immigration and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

The show is in its second year and one of three original programs on Channel 99. The other two shows began this fall and include: "Imagine That," a children's storybook reading program and "Inside the System with Maggie Smith and Dr. David Kanervo," a live political show.

Original programming is relatively new to the station. In the past, the channel mainly covered campus sports events. In recent years, the communication department has added several non-sports programs to the line-up, said Kathy Lee, assistant communications professor.

"In the last few years, we have had huge developments," Lee said. "Basically, now we are trying to do things other than just sports." (The Leaf-Chronicle, Nov. 13, 2007)

He might be a 75th-generation descendant of the famous Chinese philosopher and teacher Confucius, but University of Memphis geography professor Dr. Hsiangte Kung is more concerned with his native country's future than its past.

Specifically, Kung hopes to strengthen ties between the United States and China, two nations leading the way in globalization - the figurative "flattening" of the world through the rapid rise of technology and increased trade among nations.

Kung will get his chance as director of the Confucius Institute, which formed at the U of M this fall under the auspices of the Beijing-based Office of Chinese Language Council International.

The U of M's Institute is the 24th in the U.S. and one of more than 100 worldwide. The U of M's institute will partner with Hubei University in China. The two institutions will engage in information and cultural exchange for professors and students.

"We at the Confucius Institute will make Chinese understand Americans and make Americans understand the Chinese," Kung said. "Through the understanding and through the trust, we can build a much better relationship and also have a better world to live in.” (The Daily News, Nov. 5, 2007)