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After about two months at the Austin Peay State University helm, President Tim Hall has been cautious to set aside decisions made during the administration of former President Sherry Hoppe.

But, concerning the revamping of the developmental studies program, Hall has made the decision to restore a 25-percent salary cut affecting five former DSP math faculty members that was slated to take effect 2008.

"The credit goes to Bruce (Speck, APSU provost, vice president academic affairs). He made the decision and I completely concur," Hall said.
After about two months at the Austin Peay State University helm, President Tim Hall has been cautious to set aside decisions made during the administration of former President Sherry Hoppe.

But, concerning the revamping of the developmental studies program, Hall has made the decision to restore a 25-percent salary cut affecting five former DSP math faculty members that was slated to take effect 2008.

"The credit goes to Bruce (Speck, APSU provost, vice president academic affairs). He made the decision and I completely concur," Hall said.

The former developmental studies program has evolved into an online version that provides core credit for students the former remedial program did not.

This year's implementation of redesigning the former developmental studies program, geared toward preparing students for college-level algebra, has been a contentious situation especially for six former DSP math faculty. Five have been transferred into newly created professional staff positions this year, and one faculty member decided to leave Austin Peay for a teaching position at a local middle school.

The DSP math faculty group sought legal counsel and filed a formal grievance in February, but after review, the grievance committee held that Hoppe had not violated University policies.

The faculty group contended a precedent of moving tenured faculty without their consent was a dangerous move.

Austin Peay administration officials indicate the revamping of the developmental studies program and subsequent faculty changes were necessitated by recent Tennessee Board of Regents policy. (The Leaf-Chronicle, Oct. 6, 2007)

Compare Tennessee's public colleges and universities, and you'll find the higher-wage earners, on average, come from the University of Tennessee.
But the students most likely to take a job in-state after graduation come from community colleges.

The findings are from the second part of a University of Tennessee study released recently that looked at the employment and earnings trends of graduates from the state's public colleges and universities. Those include five UT campuses and the six universities and 14 community colleges in the Tennessee Board of Regents system.

The report's comparison of colleges and universities found differences in wages for full-time workers, as well as the rate at which pay grew.

For instance, students at Board of Regents universities with bachelor's degrees made $31,815 annually in the third quarter after graduation, according to the report. For UT students with bachelor's degrees, the average salary was lower, $31,104. But 25 quarters after graduation, UT students with bachelor's degrees made $48,086 compared with $45,164 for Board of Regents university graduates.

The most significant difference in pay was found among earners of professional degrees, where initial wages differed by $15,000, according to the report. UT graduates earned just more than $50,000 annually and Board of Regents school graduates earned just less than $35,000 on average. (Knoxville News Sentinel, Oct. 9, 2007)

Student leadership at MTSU made it clear recently that there is no room for pistol-brandishing students on higher education campuses.

The Student Government Association voted down a resolution 23-4 that would have asked the administration to ask legislators to allow students, faculty and staff members with state-issued gun permits to bring guns on campus legally.

Criminal justice major Jeremy Anthony applauded the results of the vote.

"I don't think it sets a good precedent to have guns on campus at all," the junior said. "It's irrational to think that after an eight-hour (gun-permitting) course, students in a dangerous situation would be able to hit their target in a crowd of 24,000 students."

Student senator Matthew Hurtt, a junior, introduced the motion, championing self-defense rights in the wake of recent gun violence at the University of Memphis and Virginia Tech. In early October, an Antioch student was killed in Memphis, while a rampage this past spring at Virginia Tech left 32 people and the shooter dead. (Daily News Journal, Oct. 5, 2007)