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A Virginia Tech senior from South Korea was behind the massacre of at least 30 people locked inside a campus building in the deadliest shooting rampage in modern U.S. history, the university said today.

Ballistics tests also show that one of the guns inside that building was used in another shooting two hours earlier, at a dorm, Virginia State Police said.

Police identified the shooter as Cho Seung-Hui, 23, a senior from South Korea who was in the English department at Virginia Tech and lived on campus.
A Virginia Tech senior from South Korea was behind the massacre of at least 30 people locked inside a campus building in the deadliest shooting rampage in modern U.S. history, the university said today.

Ballistics tests also show that one of the guns inside that building was used in another shooting two hours earlier, at a dorm, Virginia State Police said.

Police identified the shooter as Cho Seung-Hui, 23, a senior from South Korea who was in the English department at Virginia Tech and lived on campus.

"It's certainly reasonable to assume that Cho was the shooter in both cases," but authorities haven't made the link for sure, said Col. Steve Flaherty, superintendent of the Virginia State Police.

A law enforcement official, speaking on condition of anonymity because the information had not been announced, said Cho was carrying a backpack that contained receipts for a March purchase of a Glock 9 mm pistol.

The bloodbath ended with the gunman's suicide, bringing the death toll from two separate shootings -- first at a dorm, then in a classroom building -- to 33 and stamping the campus in the picturesque Blue Ridge Mountains with unspeakable tragedy. (The Associated Press, April 17, 2007)

Belmont University announced last week plans to start a college of pharmacy, with an inaugural class of at least 60 students in the fall of 2008.

The four-year doctorate program gradually would grow to host 300-350 students in four classes, turning out 70-75 professional pharmacists each year.

It will cost roughly $1 million to launch and eventually employ 25-30 full-time faculty members, Belmont Provost Dan McAlexander said.

"Talk of a pharmacy program actually began in the 1990s, along with our other health sciences programs," McAlexander said, referring to Belmont's physical therapy, occupational therapy and nursing programs. "It was partly at the suggestions of some of our partnerships in these areas that we started to take a good hard look at pharmacy, so we began an official review last summer."

The fact that nearby Lipscomb University announced in November that it, too, plans to start a pharmacy college with classes also set to start in Fall 2008 had nothing to do with the timing of the Belmont announcement, McAlex ander said. Both schools called the timing a coincidence. (The Tennessean, April 10, 2007)

Football is dead at East Tennessee State University — again.

In a referendum last week, students overwhelmingly rejected a proposal to increase fees to help revive ETSU's football team, leading President Paul Stanton to declare the quest over.

“It is as far as I'm concerned,” Stanton said, adding that the fee would have been the most important financial component toward restoring play in 2010.

In a news release, administrators reported that the question failed by a margin of 18 percentage points. Of 3,229 votes cast, 1,907 students or about 59 percent were opposed to the fee, and 1,322 or nearly 41 percent were in favor.

About 27 percent of ETSU's student body participated in the online referendum over a two-day voting period.

The referendum asked students whether ETSU should increase its athletic fee by $50 per semester next school year and again in 2009 to support football and equivalent programs necessary for gender equity.

The existing athletic fee is $75 per semester. Had the referendum passed, students would have paid $350 per year in athletic fees beginning in Fall 2009.

The fee would have generated about $2.4 million in annual support for football and equivalent programs necessary for gender equity. Without it, ETSU would have to raise a minimum of $3 million each year in private support to field a competitive team, Stanton said.

“I just don't see that happening,” he said. (Johnson City Press, April 12, 2007)