Go back

News in higher education

Walters State Community College is among the nations top community colleges, according to a recent survey.

A total of 447 community colleges were included in the survey, which measures students' perceptions of college programs and services.

The survey is administered directly to community college students across the nation and is used by colleges for assessment and accountability purposes.
Walters State Community College is among the nation's top community colleges, according to a recent survey.

A total of 447 community colleges were included in the survey, which measures students' perceptions of college programs and services.

The survey is administered directly to community college students across the nation and is used by colleges for assessment and accountability purposes.

In the area of student-faculty interaction, Walters State rated above average on every indicator. Walters State was notably above average in the category measuring the number of students who talk with their instructors and advisers about their career plans and activities other than coursework.

The report also shows Walters State as above average in the area of "support for learners," especially in the areas of counseling and financial aid.

Walters State also scored above the mean on indicators related to student effort and academic challenge. (Mountain Press, Jan. 9, 2007)

Gov. Phil Bredesen welcomed the first 72 students to East Tennessee State University's new pharmacy school on Jan. 8.

"Ladies and gentlemen, the ETSU College of Pharmacy is open for business," said Dr. Larry Calhoun, the college's dean, after the governor presented white coats to each of the students.

The ETSU program becomes the second pharmacy school in Tennessee, joining the University of Tennessee's Memphis-based program, and the first in the eastern portion of the state.

ETSU officials and supporters proposed the school in 2004 to address a shortage of pharmacists in rural areas, noting about 300 pharmacists were being recruited annually from outside the state to fill vacancies.

Bredesen essentially gave ETSU the green light last year when the college surpassed his challenge to raise $7.5 million for its new school. (Knoxville News Sentinel, Jan. 9, 2007)

A below-average score on the ACT college entrance exam would be high enough to earn some high school students free tuition to community college under the proposed Governor's 19-19-19 Program.

Gov. Phil Bredesen introduced the program concept last year during his re-election campaign, promoting it as a way to help "C" students gain access to college. The Tennessee Board of Regents developed a proposal for the program in late November.

To be eligible, a student must have an overall score of 19 on the ACT college entrance exam, and a 19 in math and English. The ACT has four sections: English, math, reading and science. The writing portion is optional.

Nationally, the average composite ACT score for the high school class of 2006 was 21.1, according to data released in August. Tennessee students had an average score of 20.7. ACT scores range from 1 to 36.

The Tennessee General Assembly will consider the governor's proposal, which would reward some 4,700 students with free tuition. (Chattanooga Times Free Press, Jan. 8, 2007)

The University of Memphis is among 62 colleges and universities in the nation and two in Tennessee to be designated as "Community Engaged" by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

The U of M is the only public university in Tennessee to receive the classification. It received the designation for its curricular engagement and outreach partnerships, which represent the highest level in the classification system. (Memphis Daily News, Jan. 5, 2007)