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News in higher education

A new study released this week on the economic impact of higher education in middle Tennessee shows that 20 colleges and universities in the midstate enroll nearly 100,000 students, provide employment for 75,000 people and create an overall economic impact of $5.5 billion annually.

By comparison, health care contributes $18.3 billion and the music industry injects $6.3 billion, according to separate studies released earlier this year.

As for ranking higher education with health care and music, the director of the study said it's a fruitless venture.
A new study released this week on the economic impact of higher education in middle Tennessee shows that 20 colleges and universities in the midstate enroll nearly 100,000 students, provide employment for 75,000 people and create an overall economic impact of $5.5 billion annually.

By comparison, health care contributes $18.3 billion and the music industry injects $6.3 billion, according to separate studies released earlier this year.

As for ranking higher education with health care and music, the director of the study said it's a fruitless venture.

"I don't think you can use this study to list those industries one, two or three, because they are very different," said Murat Arik, associate director of the Business and Economic Research Center at Middle Tennessee State University. "What this study says is that middle Tennessee has a great infrastructure in place and education ranks among the leading industries in this region. More importantly, it will be an essential element for the region's continued growth."

The study is expected to put higher education on the same stage as health care and music. (The Tennessean, Nov. 29, 2006)

The addition of a College of Pharmacy will bring about 70 new students and 30 new faculty to Lipscomb University starting in the fall of 2008, officials said.

The university, which has about 2,500 students, started a nursing school three years ago. The new venture, designed to help meet a growing demand for pharmacists as the U.S. population ages and the need for health care increases, will be the first college of pharmacy in middle Tennessee.

The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy in Memphis is the only accredited pharmacy school in the state. East Tennessee State University in Johnson City has developed a pharmacy program and is awaiting its accreditation.

The decision by Lipscomb's board of trustees to create the new program followed seven months of research and discussion. A national pharmacy education consultant was hired to advise the board and a faculty task force reviewed the proposal.

Students would earn a doctor of pharmacy degree, which is required of a practicing pharmacist. (The Tennessean, Nov. 17, 2006)

The Department of Defense's Air Force Office of Scientific Research has awarded $1 million to Tennessee State University to establish a nanoscience and biotechnology laboratory and research Program.

The money will let the university finish a nanoscience and biotechnology laboratory in the Research and Sponsored Programs facility that is under construction.

Research in the program will include projects relevant to national science and technology goals, according to a release. It will support the missions of the Department of Defense, Department of Energy, NASA, Department of Homeland Security, National Institutes of Health and others. (Nashville Business Journal, Nov. 27, 2006)

The National Cancer Institute has awarded $14 million to the Meharry/Vanderbit-Ingram Cancer Center Partnership.

The renewal grant gives $10 million to Meharry Medical College and $4 million to Vanderbilt-Ingram for research aimed at reducing cancer mortality among African Americans and other minorities.

Grant money will provide opportunities for cancer research projects, recruitment of cancer research scientists, epidemiologists and oncologists, as well as fund underwriting for training in cancer research for minority students in several Meharry and Vanderbilt graduate programs. (Nashville Business Journal, Nov. 27, 2006)