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News in higher education

Administrators at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga said they are working on a plan to offer in-state tuition to students who live in neighboring Georgia and Alabama counties.

The university is considering several options. One possibility is to offer out-of-state tuition waivers only to juniors and seniors. Another is to offer such waivers only to students who major in high-demand fields such as nursing or teaching.
Administrators at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga said they are working on a plan to offer in-state tuition to students who live in neighboring Georgia and Alabama counties.

The university is considering several options. One possibility is to offer out-of-state tuition waivers only to juniors and seniors. Another is to offer such waivers only to students who major in high-demand fields such as nursing or teaching.

Other Tennessee colleges near the state border already offer tuition breaks. Those include the University of Memphis, Tennessee Technological University, UT-Martin and Austin Peay State University.

East Tennessee State University this fall began offering out-of-state tuition waivers for students in bordering Virginia and North Carolina counties. (Chattanooga Times Free Press, Oct. 23, 2006)

Reaction on area colleges and universities was mixed after the national College Board released last week its annual report on the status of higher education.

“You can make statistics say anything,” said Debra Bauer, vice president for finance and administrative services at Nashville State Technical Community College. “This unique group of part-time, adult students cannot afford to pay out-of-pocket tuition fees (unlike high-schoolers who qualify for federal assistance) and make barely enough to not qualify for federal assistance.”

The New York-based College Board is a nonprofit better known for administering the SAT, a nationally recognized college entrance test.

Vanderbilt University says it wholeheartedly endorses advocating the importance of financial assistance and “need-based aid” for students preparing to attend college.

The five principal topics the College Board focused on in the report were pricing, total budgets, institutional finances, student aid and education in the nation's public, private and community colleges. (The City Paper, Oct. 25, 2006)

East Tennessee State University has been named to the first national President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, earning an additional designation of Distinction for General Community Service.

The Honor Roll program is an initiative created in response to President George W. Bush's call to service by building on and supporting the civic engagement mission of the nations colleges and universities.

ETSU shares the distinction with 98 other institutions, among them Duke University, Georgetown University and the University of Virginia. Overall, some 510 schools applied for recognition through the program.

Among a student population of 12,000, some 2,300 participated in community service projects during the past year. (Morristown-Citizen Tribune, Oct. 26, 2006)

Tennessee State University's newest president has a new vision for the school's future.
An inauguration ceremony was held Friday morning for TSU's seventh president, Dr. Melvin Johnson.

Johnson actually began his role as president in June, replacing former President James Hefner.
Before coming to TSU, Johnson was provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina. (www.wsmv.com, Oct. 27, 2006)