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News in higher education

The Robertson County Joint Economic and Community Development Board unanimously passed a resolution recently to support local efforts to bring a community college into the county.

Robertson County and the city of Springfield are working together on the project, officials said.
In February, officials from Volunteer State Community College (Vol State) visited Springfield to discuss future plans for educational facilities in Robertson County.
The Robertson County Joint Economic and Community Development Board unanimously passed a resolution recently to support local efforts to bring a community college into the county.

Robertson County and the city of Springfield are working together on the project, officials said.
In February, officials from Volunteer State Community College (Vol State) visited Springfield to discuss future plans for educational facilities in Robertson County.

In joint meetings, the Library Board, County Commission, and Springfield Board of Mayor and Aldermen have agreed that having educational facilities for Vol State included in the new library being planned for Robertson County would be ideal.

According to County Executive Howard Bradley, about 4,800 square feet is needed for the educational facilities.

Figures provided by Vol State indicate an increase in enrollment at the college with Robertson County being one of the main contributors to the growth.

More than 500 students enroll from Robertson County, representing a 16 percent increase over five years, with 178 of the students from Springfield, according to the statistics. (The Tennessean, Oct. 18, 2006)

To compete globally, Tennessee must do more to prepare its students for a four-year college degree, Roane State Community College President Gary Goff said.

“All the walls and boundaries in education have come down,” he recently told the League of Women Voters at a luncheon.

In a world of greater access via technology, “we have to be competitive,” he said.
Goff said countries such as Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and others are reaching or have surpassed America in terms of educational ability and preparedness.

“We need to double the number of bachelor's degrees without compromising quality,” Goff said.
In Tennessee, Goff said six out of 10 students will graduate high school and 15 students will graduate college. (The Oak Ridger, Oct. 18, 2006)

The Tennessee Lottery's recent transfer of $62.2 million to the state's Lottery for Education Account pushes the amount raised for education to nearly $700 million, officials said.

The number of Lottery awards given to students is on the rise, said Rebecca Paul, president and CEO of the Tennessee Lottery.

According to the Tennessee Student Assistance Corp., the organization that oversees the Lottery-funded scholarship programs, more than 65,000 students will receive awards during the 2006-07 school year. (www.chattanoogan.com, Oct. 17, 2006)

A pioneering program allowing high school seniors to earn college credit on a college campus has won Northeast State Community College recognition from the Tennessee Board of Regents.

The Career Fast Track Program at Northeast State recently received the Academic Excellence Award from the TBR.

While articulated credit and dual credit for career/technical courses already existed, Fast Track offers career/technical credit courses on the college campus as well as the potential for a paid cooperative education program for students. (Kingsport Times News, Oct. 19, 2006)