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News in higher education

Projects at the local Tennessee Technology Center in the Industrial Park and at Austin Peay State University are among nearly $156 million in construction projects to be considered by the Tennessee Board of Regents.

TBR, which oversees 13 of Tennessees community colleges, 26 technology centers and six universities, including APSU – is expected to review the list when it meets at APSU for its regular quarterly meeting Sept. 28-29.
Projects at the local Tennessee Technology Center in the Industrial Park and at Austin Peay State University are among nearly $156 million in construction projects to be considered by the Tennessee Board of Regents.

TBR, which oversees 13 of Tennessee's community colleges, 26 technology centers and six universities, including APSU — is expected to review the list when it meets at APSU for its regular quarterly meeting Sept. 28-29.

One of the top projects on the TBR list is about $13.4 million for expansion of the Tennessee Technology Centers at Dickson and Clarksville.

Austin Peay officials have proposed renovation to the Trahern Building, where a steel mesh net was installed to catch falling concrete. The University also has proposed almost $19 million to renovate Woodward Library.

The list will be submitted to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, which will create a master list for the state to be sent to the legislature for funding during the 2007-08 fiscal year. (The Leaf-Chronicle, Sept. 18, 2006)

The University of Tennessee's African-American enrollment numbers have increased dramatically within a three-year span.

Media Relations Coordinator Amy Blakely cited a report issued by The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education that the African-American population at UT increased 1.9 percent between 2001 and 2004.

“It was the largest jump at any of the nation's flagship state universities,” Blakely said. She also said 15 percent of this year's freshman class is minority students with about 10 percent of those students being black.

The rapid rise of black students attending UT has been attributed to aggressive recruiting made by the admissions department as well as other departments.

Richard Bayer, dean of Enrollment Services, said that UT wants to continue to raise diversity. “We want the student body to resemble that of the population of Tennessee, with not only African-Americans, but Hispanics and underprivileged students as well,” he said.

Milton said UT will maintain the trend of attracting minority students by the recruitment tactics it has now and continuing to recruit underrepresented populations.

To maintain the trend of high rates of minority students enrolling, new scholarships will be offered next fall. (The Daily Beacon, Sept. 10, 2006)

The College of Education at the University of Memphis has been awarded a grant of $1.4 million over an 18-month period to provide educational services to 76 children and the families of children in the Shelby County Head Start program.

The grant from Shelby County Head Start also will help the U of M to provide professional development opportunities to Head Start teachers and other Head Start service providers.

The program will be divided into two sites, one on the U of M campus and one off campus. The University of Memphis Head Start Center of Learning will establish a laboratory and teaching site within the Barbara K. Lipman Center at the university and satellite locations.

A home-based option will serve 36 children and their families, especially Hispanic children, and transportation and child care will be provided for those families during "socialization" days and for classroom field trips.

The University/Shelby County joint effort also will ensure that eligible children receive speech, hearing and language therapeutic services, mental health services, nutrition services, and health and safety services.

The children and their families will not be the only beneficiaries of the collaboration. Head Start teachers and service coordinators from all Shelby County Head Start sites will be offered professional development opportunities in form of observations and interactions with teachers at the Centers of Learning and other professional staff in order to increase positive teaching styles and to improve outcomes for students in classrooms. (The Commercial Appeal, Sept. 13, 2006)

Keeping health care professionals current in the rapidly changing world of medical treatment is the goal of a newly created alliance in Chattanooga.

The University of Tennessee College of Medicine and the Chattanooga State Technical Community College Community Health Institute will develop educational programs that target both physicians and pharmacists.

Beginning Sept. 28, monthly lecture series will be offered in the Probasco Auditorium of the Erlanger Medical Mall on the Erlanger Baroness campus. The first presentation will be Pharmacotherapeutic Targets presented by Mechanisms of Alzheimers Disease Pathophysiology presented by John B. Standridge, M.D., professor of Family Medicine with the UT College of Medicine.

The lectures will be promoted through an alliance with the Chattanooga Area Pharmacists Society. (Chattanoogan.com, Sept. 15, 2006)