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News in higher education

Tuition will rise in Tennessee, predictions show
The Tennessee Higher Education Commission has developed a formula that will predict college tuition increases.

The model, presented Dec. 1 to the Tennessee Board of Regents, will help state legislators know the impact on tuition before they cast their budget vote. Under the equation, tuition at East Tennessee State University would have to rise $1,400 to $4,000 over the next five years from its current level of $9,262 – an annual jump of 5.7 percent to 13.4 percent, said Dr. Bob Adams, vice chancellor and APSU alumnus. Tuition will rise in Tennessee, predictions show
The Tennessee Higher Education Commission has developed a formula that will predict college tuition increases.

The model, presented Dec. 1 to the Tennessee Board of Regents, will help state legislators know the impact on tuition before they cast their budget vote. Under the equation, tuition at East Tennessee State University would have to rise $1,400 to $4,000 over the next five years from its current level of $9,262 — an annual jump of 5.7 percent to 13.4 percent, said Dr. Bob Adams, vice chancellor and APSU alumnus.

The calculation considered annual increases of 3.4 percent in economic inflation, 1 percent in enrollment, 2.5 percent in state appropriations and 3 percent in spending growth per student at similar schools. But Adams said a drop in state funding or a rise in peer schools' spending could easily lead to the higher 134 percent hike.

TBR this fall approved a 9.7 percent tuition increase for member four-year schools, including APSU. College bills climbed about $400 from Fall 2004 to Fall 2005. Since 2000, tuition increases have been as high as 15 percent.

TBR officials and APSU President Dr. Sherry Hoppe said they are concerned the continuing rise of tuition not only prevents students from enrolling and graduating from a postsecondary institution, but also places students at financial risk. (The Leaf-Chronicle, Dec. 2, 2005)

Gender equity better but still UT faculty issue
Full-time female professors at the University of Tennessee make three-quarters as much as their male counterparts, an annual faculty salary study shows.

More than 80 percent of professors and more than 75 percent of tenured faculty members are men at UT. In the most recent study, full-time male faculty members had an average salary of $74,529. Women there averaged $55,811 — a difference of $18,718.

Knoxville Chancellor Loren Crabtree said one of his top priorities is to have gender equity in terms of salaries. (Chattanooga Times Free Press, Nov. 30, 2005)

Free college courses offered online by JSCC
Jackson State Community College near Humboldt has joined other colleges in Tennessee in offering free college courses for high school students.

Funding is through the federal program, Tech Prep Articulation, used by the state Department of Education and sifted through the Tennessee Board of Regents.

The program uses online testing. Courses include marketing, agriculture, business, information technology, health science, and manufacturing and industrial technology.

To be eligible, students must attend a public high school, have at least a 2.0 grade-point average and be recommended by a teacher. (The Chronicle, Nov. 23, 2005)

Motlow State Community College president to resign
Dr. Arthur L. Walker Jr. has announced his resignation as president of Motlow State Community College, effective June 30, 2006.

The resignation will culminate a 44-year career for Walker, who was named Motlow's fourth president in October 2002.

In his announcement to the campus community, Walker said he wanted to spend more time with his family and “other personal interests.”

Under Walker's administration at Motlow, the college expanded course scheduling and online courses, entered into a partnership with Tennessee Tech University to provide the 2+2 Elementary Education Program and increased enrollment in the dual enrollment program. (Inklings faculty-staff newsletter for Motlow State Community College, December 2005-January 2006)