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News in higher ed

•The University of Mississippi and Delta State University plan to ask the state College Board for the option of charging tuition based on credit hours, no matter how many hours students take. Currently, undergrads who take less than 12 hours are charged per hour, while students who take 12 or more hours pay the same tuition. (Sun Herald, 6/10/04)

•Lesley College, one of Massachusetts few remaining womens colleges, will admit men to it undergraduate program for the first time next year. (Boston Channel, 6/9/04)
•The University of Mississippi and Delta State University plan to ask the state College Board for the option of charging tuition based on credit hours, no matter how many hours students take. Currently, undergrads who take less than 12 hours are charged per hour, while students who take 12 or more hours pay the same tuition. (Sun Herald, 6/10/04)

•Lesley College, one of Massachusetts' few remaining women's colleges, will admit men to it undergraduate program for the first time next year. (Boston Channel, 6/9/04)

•University of California Vice President Larry Hershman and California State University Chancellor Charles Reed were in the hot seat as democratic state senators rebuked them for abandoning a fight to reinstate thousands of qualified freshman applicants turned away because of budget cuts. The two had struck a deal with Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to divert more than 11,000 eligible UC and CSU applicants to community colleges for two years. (Sacramento Bee, 6/9/04)

•A group of Tennessee State University supporters has sent a list of 25 black men and women it feels should be considered by Gov. Phil Bredesen to fill three open slots on the Tennessee Board of Regents and boost the board's minority representation. (The Tennessean, 6/9/04)

•Catholic University blocked students from starting an NAACP chapter on campus, saying it would “cause redundancy” with existing campus groups and expressing concern about the organization's advocacy of abortion rights. (The Washington Post, 6/4/04)

•With nearly 24,000 Cougar alums in King County and an additional 20,000 throughout the Puget Sound area, Washington State University opened a first-of-its-kind retail and educational showcase in downtown Seattle's Westlake Center June 4. (dBusinessNews Seattle, 6/3/04)

•The fact that only one member of the Tennessee Board of Regents is black is expected to change soon. Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen, who could replace as many as three members of the TBR, has said that having only one minority member on the board does not reflect the diversity of the state. Maxine Smith, Memphis, is TBR's only African-American member. According to the 2000 Census, one in six of the state's citizens are African-American, so a representative board would include three black regents. (The Tennessean, 6/1/04)