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News in higher ed

•New York has joined nine other states–Arkansas, California, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Virginia and West Virginia–in restricting credit card solicitation on college campuses and requiring some consumer education. (Associated Press, 6/25/04)
•New York has joined nine other states—Arkansas, California, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Missouri, New Mexico, Virginia and West Virginia—in restricting credit card solicitation on college campuses and requiring some consumer education. (Associated Press, 6/25/04)

•Blandina Cardenas, incoming president of the University of Texas-Pan American, started off on the wrong foot last week as her plans to get rid of the provost were inadvertently aired during a live Internet broadcast to faculty and reporters. Her comments were made public when someone on the university system's technical staff accidentally pushed a button. (Associated Press, 6/25/04)

•At Boston University, admissions counselors are online all day, crashing a party once dominated by high-schoolers: instant messaging. The university began using the technology three years ago to field questions on admissions procedures, college life and application status. (The Washington Times, 6/24/04)

•A study by the Pew Hispanic Center says that although Hispanic high school students are as likely as their white counterparts to enter college, they are half as likely to finish a bachelor's degree. (USA Today, 6/23/04)

•A university task force has recommended all athletes transferring to Baylor University should undergo criminal background checks and allow access to disciplinary records at previous colleges. The task force was formed last summer after basketball player Patrick Dennehy was allegedly killed by his former teammate, Carlton Dotson. (Winston-Salem Journal, 6/23/04)

•Although charitable giving in the U.S. last year rose by the highest rate in three years, educational organizations and foundations were the only groups to experience declines in giving, according to the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University. (Associated Press, 6/21/04)

•Under pressure from parents who want to make sure their children will land the right jobs, New York University is inviting liberal arts students to sign up for vocational courses in the School of Continuing and Professional Studies. The program, “Professsional Edge,” will not offer students credit toward their degrees but will help prepare them for the job market. For example, an art history major might learn how to appraise art. A foreign language student might learn how to become a translator.

•About two-thirds of this year's 3 million high school graduates will enter college this fall, but only half will graduate. (The Washington Post, 6/15/04)