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Hungarian creator of pocket-sized art lectures March 21

Often, great things come in small packages. Such is the case with artist Andrea Dezsos pocket-sized works.

The APSU visiting artist will lecture about her experiences as an artist, designer, writer and educator at 7 p.m., Monday, March 21, in APSUs Trahern Gallery.
Often, great things come in small packages. Such is the case with artist Andrea Dezso's pocket-sized works.

The APSU visiting artist will lecture about her experiences as an artist, designer, writer and educator at 7 p.m., Monday, March 21, in APSU's Trahern Gallery.

Best known for her palm-sized works of fiction, one-of-a-kind artist books and embroidered illustrations, Dezso's intriguing pieces reveal her adherence to non-traditional design criteria. Shrugging off years of formal training, Dezso utilizes the innate artistic abilities and instincts of her childhood in each creation.

Dezso's collection of pint-sized publications include a variety of stories: men pretending to be insects; an imaginary circus; childhood fantasies of UFO visitations, rabbits and Nadia Comaneci; and stream-of-consciousness pieces in which topics flow from corporate America to Cuban restaurant doilies. In addition to writing and illustrating each work, Dezso also sews each book and, in the case of her shadow books, secures light-emitting diodes in the pieces.

Reaching outside the typical toolkit, Dezso also fashions embroidery illustrations exploring family superstitions rooted in the “strange beliefs, intolerance, bigotry and cultural impatience” of her native Transylvania.

A full-time Parsons School of Design instructor, Dezso is represented by the Jack Tilton Gallery in New York, N.Y. Her illustrations have appeared on the cover of Print Magazine and in the New York Times.

The lecture is free and open to the public. To view Dezso's work, visit http://www.andreadezso.com.

For further information, telephone (931) 221-7333.
—Terry Stringer