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Lottery impacts MSU enrollment

Jim Vaughn, assistant vice president for enrollment management (for Murray State University), is not sure how many new students are attending Murray State this year. But he is sure that Tennessees HOPE Lottery Scholarship is having an impact.
Enrollment at Murray State University has continued to decline within the past two years, since the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program, which offers financial aid to Tennessee students who choose to remain in state to further their education, began. Lottery impacts MSU enrollment

Jim Vaughn, assistant vice president for enrollment management (for Murray State University), is not sure how many new students are attending Murray State this year. But he is sure that Tennessee's HOPE Lottery Scholarship is having an impact.
Enrollment at Murray State University has continued to decline within the past two years, since the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program, which offers financial aid to Tennessee students who choose to remain in state to further their education, began.
According to Murray State records, 1,460 first-time freshmen attended the university in Fall 2003. When the lottery program began in 2004, the number dropped to 1,358 students. Murray admitted 248 first-time freshmen from Tennessee in 2003 and only 163 in 2004.
Another factor that has added to the decline is the option for Calloway County students to receive in-state tuition at Austin Peay State University. (Murray State has a similar commitment to Tennessee students in Montgomery, Obion, Stewart and Weakley counties in Tennessee.)
“Austin Peay has recently been very, very aggressive in trying to enroll more students,” Vaughn said. He said a percentage of APSU students are soldiers at Fort Campbell and are about to deploy. The University may be compensating for those students who will be gone, Vaughn said.
(The Murray State News, Aug. 26, 2005)

University of Wisconsin-Madison gets A+ for partying
To the sound of cheers from some students and jeers from faculty and administrators, the University of Wisconsin-Madison has been crowned the top party school in the country, according to an annual survey by The Princeton Review.
The Top 10 Party School List includes Ohio University, Lehigh University, UC-Santa Barbara, SUNY-Albany, Indiana University, University of Mississippi, University of Iowa, University of Massachusetts and Loyala, New Orleans. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Aug. 22, 2005)

Academic Libraries Empty Stacks for Online Centers
This fall when students enter the former undergraduate library at the University of Texas, Austin, they will not see any “Quiet Please” signs, “No food” signs and no books!
Where 90,000 tomes once filled the space in orderly fashion, returning students will find overstuffed chairs for lounging, barstools for TV-watching and booths for group work along with 250 desktop computers, 75 laptops for checkout, wireless Internet access, computer labs, software suites, a multimedia studio, a computer help desk and repair shop and a café.
UT joins a growing number of colleges and universities retooling their libraries to better serve “net generation” students. The advent of the Internet and the digitization of information have transformed the way students learn, and libraries are scrambling to catch up.
Recently, a new public high school in Vail, Colo., became one of the first to be a textbook-free environment. Rather than books, all students were assigned laptops and will read and turn in most homework online. (The Christian Science Monitor, Aug. 23, 2005)

From Our Campuses: Grants
Appalachian State University (N.C.) received a $1.8 million worth of property from donors for a new health-care center and $500,000 from Watauga Medical Center to establish the school's health-care campus.
The National Science Foundation awarded $800,000 to Eastern Kentucky University for the creation of an Environmental Research Institute.
The University of Memphis received $1.6 million from the National Institutes of Health for cardiac research and $500,000 from the Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the long-term sustainability and quality of the region's unique ground water. (AASCU, Aug. 24, 2005)