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Current News in Higher Ed

•The University of Phoenix is offering a new advanced MBA program, the Next-Generation MBA, designed for working adults. The curriculum is focused on management, growth opportunity and leadership challenges based on business scenarios validated by executives at Fortune 1,000 corporations. (Orlando Business Journal, 8/3/05)
•The University of Phoenix is offering a new advanced MBA program, the “Next-Generation MBA,” designed for working adults. The curriculum is focused on management, growth opportunity and leadership challenges based on business scenarios validated by executives at Fortune 1,000 corporations. (Orlando Business Journal, 8/3/05)

•In South Carolina's public colleges, about 5,000 professors will become eligible to retire by 2010. The University of South Carolina, which has 1,500 full-time faculty members, expects to hire 600 new profs on its Columbia campus over the next five years. (The State, 8/3/05)

•A computer security breach at the University of Colorado at Boulder has left all 29,000 students, some alums and as many as 7,000 staff members vulnerable to identify theft. Hackers gained access to information on the CU-Boulder identification Buff OneCard used by students. The card contains Social Security numbers, names and photographs. It's the third computer security breach at CU-Boulder since July 21. (The Denver Post, 8/2/05)

•As colleges and universities gear up to receive a new class of freshmen this fall, they're bracing for a potentially more daunting onslaught: helicopter parents. These overinvolved parents are flooding campus orientations, meddling in registration and interfering with students' dealings with professors, administrators and roommates, school officials say. A number of colleges and universities are assigning full-time staffers or forming entire new departments to field parents' calls and e-mail. The University of Vermont employs “parent bouncers,” students trained to divert moms and dads who try to attend registration. At the University of Georgia, students who get confused during registration have been known to interrupt their advisers to whip out a cell phone, speed-dial their parents and say, “Here, talk to my mom,” says Richard Mullendore, a University of Georgia professor and former vice president, student affairs, at the universities of Georgia and Mississippi. The cell phone, he says, has become “the world's longest umbilical cord.” (The Wall Street Journal, 8/1/05)

•College students now can customize their dorm decor by registering for what they want at Bed, Bath & Beyond, Linens-N-Things and Wal-Mart. Some retailers will take your wish list and have everything ready at the store nearest your campus. Bed, Bath & Beyond even delivers to college dorms near its stores. (The Washington Post, 8/1/05)