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Current News in Higher Ed

•As many as 20 percent of college students nationwide have used ADD drugs like Adderall and Ritalin illegally as a study aid, according to a University of Wisconsin study in 2002. (The Salt Lake City Tribune, 7/25/05)

•Arizona State Universitys Sigma Phi Beta has become the first national, collegiate-based gay fraternity. (East Valley Tribune, 7/26/05)
•As many as 20 percent of college students nationwide have used ADD drugs like Adderall and Ritalin illegally as a “study aid,” according to a University of Wisconsin study in 2002. (The Salt Lake City Tribune, 7/25/05)

•Arizona State University's Sigma Phi Beta has become the first national, collegiate-based gay fraternity. (East Valley Tribune, 7/26/05)

•The House Committee on Education and the Workforce approved changes in the Higher Education Act that Republicans said would reduce the cost of loans, making it easier for low-income students to attend college, but that Democrats said fell far short. A vote is not expected before September. (The New York Times, 7/25/05)

•Extras like on-campus child care, evening office hours and commuter lounges count most with nontraditional students, who make up 38 percent of postsecondary enrollment, according to the U.S. Department of Education. (The Boston Globe, 7/25/05)

•Following the lead of the state's larger universities, Kentucky's smaller public colleges are employing lobbyists to plead their causes in Washington. Morehead State University has signed an $86,671 deal with a Frankfort firm run by former aides to Gov. Ernie Fletcher and U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers. The Kentucky Community and Technical College System has renewed a $155,000 deal with a Washington firm with connections to House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas). The University of Kentucky, Western Kentucky University and the University of Louisville spent a combined $450,000 on federal lobbying that went to firms that employ former congressmen, White House aides and others. (The Courier-Journal, 7/25/05)

•Pop quiz: Which schools produced the most degrees in computer science in 2001? Try Strayer University and DeVry Institute of Technology. And what kind of student is most likely to take up computer science at Strayer or DeVry? A 35-year-old African-American or Hispanic woman who already has a full-time job at a company where information technology (IT) skills are a key to advancement. (MSNBC.com/NBC News, 7/20/05)

•IBM is extending an academic outreach program to give universities free access to some of its cutting-edge research. The company will license academics to use and distribute 25 software-development technologies hosted on IBM's alphaWorks emerging-technology Web site. (ZDNet, 7/18/05)

•A U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee has proposed redefining for-profit education companies so that they may enjoy many benefits of traditional colleges, including eligibility for federal grants. The measure would put companies such as Apollo Group Inc., Career Education Corp. and ITT Educational Services Inc. into the same category as traditional colleges and universities. (Chicago Tribune, 7/15/05)