Go back

APSU prepares for deployment of 101st

February 11, 2003

During Fall 2002 and Spring 2003, Austin Peay's Center @ Fort Campbell had double-digit increases in enrollmentan amazing rebound from the declining enrollment that followed the 9/ll attacks on America.

Now APSU is planning for the impact of the deployment of the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) and Fort Campbell.
February 11, 2003

During Fall 2002 and Spring 2003, Austin Peay's Center @ Fort Campbell had double-digit increases in enrollmentan amazing rebound from the declining enrollment that followed the 9/ll attacks on America.

Now APSU is planning for the impact of the deployment of the 101st Airborne (Air Assault) and Fort Campbell.

In compliance with Public Chapter 151 of the 1991 Public Acts, the University will refund all tuition to the student-soldiers being deployed; this could amount to $400,000. Of the 1,500 students enrolled at the APSU Center@ Fort Campbell, 350 are soldiers.

But Dr. Sherry Hoppe says that while the deployment presents challenges, to do anything else would be unjust.

"Our problems pale in comparison to the sacrifices of the men and women being deployed," she says. "Our first goal is to assist those deployed with withdrawals and refunds as efficiently as possible."

Hoppe says estimating the financial impact of the deployment is difficult, due to a number of factors. "First, we must determine which portion of the tuition was paid individually by soldiers and which portion was paid by the Army. We automatically refund fees paid individually, but we do not know yet if we will be required to refund fees paid by the Army."

The difference is significant, Hoppe says. "If fees collected both from individuals and the military must be refunded, the total would be in excess of a quarter of a million dollars for the current term. If we are not required to make refunds to the Army, the net loss is only about a third of that total."

Hoppe notes that in addition to the refunds for this term, the University must project a decline in enrollment by military personnel for Spring II as well as terms in the next fiscal year, as the length of the deployment is unknown.

"At best, we can simply estimate the loss of revenue for the coming year," she says. "If the deployment is short-term, or if we can increase dependent and civilian enrollment, the reduction would be less.

Being so close to an Army base is a two-edged sword, Hoppe adds. "We benefit in many ways, but it makes our enrollment unstable. "