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APSU develops plans, seeks federal funds for Institute for Global Security Studies

January 6, 2004


Other than in the Washington, D.C., area, where international defense and security are discussed daily, folks in and around Clarksville may have the keenest understanding of the importance of securing global security, thanks in large part to the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)s historical rendezvous with destiny.

According to Dr. Sherry Hoppe, higher education institutions received more than $2 billion in special appropriations from the federal government last year. Tennessee received only $13 million of thatnone of which came to APSU. January 6, 2004


Other than in the Washington, D.C., area, where international defense and security are discussed daily, folks in and around Clarksville may have the keenest understanding of the importance of securing global security, thanks in large part to the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)'s historical “rendezvous with destiny.”

According to Dr. Sherry Hoppe, higher education institutions received more than $2 billion in special appropriations from the federal government last year. Tennessee received only $13 million of thatnone of which came to APSU.

“My goal is to increase the level of such funding in Tennessee,” Hoppe says. “Austin Peay's proposal for funding an Institute for Global Security Studies is the first of several proposals we'll work on in upcoming months and years.”

Hoppe appointed Gerald Beavers, executive director of the APSU Center @ Fort Campbell, to chair a committee charged with working on a concept for the institute. Committee members are Dr. Dewey Browder, history; Dr. David Kanervo and Dr. Matthew Kenney, political science; Dr. David Denton, College of Professional Programs and Social Sciences; Dr. Andrew Barrass, biology; Dr. Carrie Brennan, chemistry; Dr. M. D. Waheeduzzaman, public management; Eric Provost, public safety; and Col. Greg Lane, ROTC.

According to Hoppe, if funding is secured and approval for the new degree programs is granted by TBR and THEC, the institute would provide both credit and non-credit programming in multidisciplinary subjects:

•An interdisciplinary bachelor's degree in global studies with several concentrations, including cyber security, public administration with an emphasis on homeland defense, political science with an emphasis on terrorist organizations and chemical, biological and nuclear threats.

•A master's degree in military history with emphasis in such areas as the history of terrorism and conventional vs. unconventional warfare.

•Non-credit programming, such as rapid-response training and protection of infrastructure systems.

“The University is uniquely positioned to develop and implement the proposed institute as a result of its ongoing relationship with the military,” Hoppe says.

“Austin Peay is located within 10 miles of Fort Campbell, one of the nation's major military installations. For more than 30 years, we have provided on-site education to more than 30,000 military personnel, military retirees and dependents at the education center on post.

“The historical relationship between Austin Peay and Fort Campbell would be beneficial in establishing the Institute for Global Security Studies. Not only is there an immediate enrollment base available, but Fort Campbell military officers can help develop the program and teach in the proposed institute.”

The total projected start-up cost for the proposed institute, which still is being finalized, is expected to be in excess of $10 million.
—Dennie Burke