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APSU chosen for Tournees Festival French film grant program

Austin Peay State University has been selected to participate in the French American Cultural Exchange (FACE) French film grant program, the Tournées Festival, for the 2009-10 academic year.

This grant provides an opportunity for APSU to give students and the community greater access to contemporary French films and to encourage French-American cooperation and cultural understanding.
Austin Peay State University has been selected to participate in the French American Cultural Exchange (FACE) French film grant program, the Tournées Festival, for the 2009-10 academic year.

This grant provides an opportunity for APSU to give students and the community greater access to contemporary French films and to encourage French-American cooperation and cultural understanding.

“APSU is delighted to invite the local community to enjoy the Tournées French Film Festival during the month of February,” said Tina Rousselot de Saint Ceran, coordinator of International Education at APSU.

The following schedule includes the title of the film, time and date of showing, details such as movie ratings and description of the plot.
“Azur et Asmar” (Azur and Asmar)
6 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 4
Clement Auditorium
Director: Michel Ocelot
Awards: Kids Audience Award, Munich Film Festival (2007)
Genre: Animated/Family
Running time: 90 minutes
Rating: Not rated, contains some nudity

Michel Ocelot, best known for 1998's “Kirikou and the Sorceress,” combines cut-out and CGI animation to produce his fourth animated feature that tells the story of two boys — the white, blue-eyed prince Azur and the dark-skinned Asmar, both of whom are being raised by Asmar's mother. Separated by Azur's father, the boys meet up again several years later in an unidentified Arab countrywhere Azur's blue eyes terrify the locals, leading him to feign blindnessin order to free a magical fairy. Deftly yet subtly addressing racism, intolerance and superstition, “Azur and Asmar” also dazzles with its sheer beauty: Ocelot incorporates visual elements and techniques inspired by medieval illuminations and Arabic art, including mosaics and meticulously rendered architectural details.

“La faute a Fidel” (Blame It on Fidel)
6 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 9
Clement Auditorium
Director: Julie Gavras
Genre: Drama
Running time: 99 minutes
Rating: Not rated, contains adult content including nudity


Anna is a 9-year-old precocious girl. Her life is rather simple and comfortable, regulated by habits and order. Her family is wealthy; she goes to a private religious school and often visits her grandparents who have a wine estate in Bordeaux. One day, her father's sister is forced to leave Spain — her husband has just been killed by Franco's police force. This event is experienced as an electroshock by Anna's parents, and they change their political views radically. Both become left-wing revolutionaries and Anna's stable life goes awry. Women's rights, freedom of speech, democracy and demonstration are now at the forefront of Anna's parents' lives. At first, Anna is not interested in any of it. She strives to hold on to the comfort she knows and is very unhappy when the family moves to a smaller apartment. She also has to adapt to her parents' new lifestyle as they have less time to take care of her. Yet, she also tries to make sense of the larger political events that shake her life and she does not settle for the simplistic answers that adults give children.

“Le fils de l'épicier”
(The Grocer's Son)
6 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 18
Clement Auditorium
Director: Eric Guirado
Genre: Drama
Running time: 96 minutes
Rating: Not rated, contains adult content including nudity


When his father has a sudden heart attack, it's up to jaded and distant Antoine Sforza, a young man who has distanced himself from his roots, to take over the family business at the age of 30. Leaving behind his dead-end job as a waiter and his tiny apartment in Paris, he grudgingly moves home to Provence, in the south of France, to run a small mobile grocery store. His family's food truck is integral to the daily shopping of the feisty elderly French neighbors who inhabit the local countryside and purchase his vegetables. Although Antoine is curt and surly with his customers (as well as with most of the people he meets), he succeeds in bringing to Provence his favorite aspect of Paris: his beautiful, confident neighbor, Claire, upon whom he harbors a secret crush. Antoine and Claire both move into his mother's home, where Claire studies for an exam and Antoine slowly begins to get to know the community and himself a little bit better.

“Le scaphandre et le papillon” (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly)
6 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 23
Clement Auditorium
Director: Julian Schnabel
Awards: Best Director, Technical Grand Prize, Cannes Film Festival (2007). Best Director, Independent Spirit Awards (2008).
Genre: Drama
Running time: 112 minutes
Rated: PG-13


As the editor of French magazine ELLE, Jean-Dominique Bauby was a key player in Parisian social and cultural circles before suffering a massive stroke at the age of 43. He developed what doctors called a locked-in syndrome: he lost all muscle control, save his left eyelid. Blinking one letter at a time, he composed a book describing his new life. As soon as it was published, the book became an international best-seller. Bauby died shortly after. This is the basis of Julian Schnabel's enthralling film in which Bauby summons enormous courage, determination and his soaring imagination to escape from his trap. Tapping into the limitlessness of his memories, fantasies, wit and desires, he finds a way to race through experiences of wonder and grief, sex and love, fatherhood and childhood, faith and questioning, ecstasy and absurdity — and touches the very essence of what it is to be human. Along the way he is buoyed by five remarkable women: Céline, the mother of his children who remains devoted to him despite his betrayal; Inés, the girlfriend who still haunts him; Henriette and Marie, who give him the power to reconnect with the world and his loved ones; and Claude, who becomes his literary assistant.

“Ne le dis à personne” (Tell No One)
6 p.m., Thursday. Feb 25
Clement Auditorium
Director: Guillaume Canet
Awards: Best Director, Best Actor (François Cluzet), Best Editing, Best Music (Matthieu Chedid), César Awards (2007) Best Film and World Audience Award, Lumière Awards (2007).
Genre: Thriller
Running time: 125 minutes
Rating: Not rated, contains adult content including nudity


Alex, a pediatrician, has been devastated since his wife Margot, his childhood sweetheart, was savagely murdered eight years ago. One day he receives an anonymous e-mail: when he clicks on the inserted link, he sees a woman's face standing in a crowd, being filmed live. Alex is in shock: he is looking at Margot's face. Is she still alive? Why does she instruct him to tell no one? As soon as Alex raises the lid of this Pandora's box, the police reopen the murder case. They are sure that Alex is the perpetrator of his wife's gruesome murder since he was actually with her when she was killed. He finds himself on the wrong end of the investigation. He must lead his own to prove his innocence and find out what really happened to his wife. The film plunges into the past, stirring old memories of happier times in Alex's mind. The investigation also forces family and friends to remember details they'd rather keep buried. Alex's unrelenting questioning will unravel a sordid story that will incriminate unscrupulous family members and ultimately reunite him with his wife.


For more information about the Tournees Festival, call the Office of International Education at (931) 221-6851, or visit the International Education Web site at http://www.apsu.edu/internationaled. -- Melony Shemberger