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Alums to be inducted into PKP for international contributions to the sciences

The APSU chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi has chosen two alumni, both of whom are renowned scientists, for induction into the PKP Hall of Fame.

Dr. Monte Gates and Dr. Timothy Fox will be inducted during ceremonies slated for 6:30-8:30 p.m., Thursday, April 14, in Clement Auditorium.

In early 2005, Gates was named an assistant professor, Schools of Medicine and Life Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, United Kingdom. From 2000-04, he was senior research associate, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University in Wales, United Kingdom.
The APSU chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi has chosen two alumni, both of whom are renowned scientists, for induction into the PKP Hall of Fame.

Dr. Monte Gates and Dr. Timothy Fox will be inducted during ceremonies slated for 6:30-8:30 p.m., Thursday, April 14, in Clement Auditorium.

In early 2005, Gates was named an assistant professor, Schools of Medicine and Life Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, United Kingdom. From 2000-04, he was senior research associate, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University in Wales, United Kingdom.

He graduated from APSU in 1989 with two bachelor of arts degreesin psychology and philosophy. From 1989-90, he was a graduate student in physiological psychology at APSU.

In 1990, President George Bush declared the ‘90s as the “Decade of the Brain.” Gates caught that wave, earning his doctorate in anatomy and neurobiology in 1995 from UT-Memphis, where he received the Sigma Xi Award for his work in transplantation to the brain.

From 1995-97, he received a postdoctoral grant to study at the University of Lund, Sweden, with Anders Bjorklund, who was recognized as the world's expert in neural transplantation and the innovator of the use of neural transplantation in treating neurodegenerative diseases.

In 1997-2000, Gates was named a Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School, where he continued to research the brain's circuitry. Historically, scientists had focused on neuronsbrain cells that tell the body what to do. Prior to Gates' research, the other brain cellsglial cellswere thought to be just insulation for the neurons.

While in Sweden, Gates discovered that glial cells “take care of” certain neurons, so he began to reason, if part of the brain were damaged and if scientists could create a short-circuit around the damaged cells, some recovery was possible.

During his fellowship at Harvard, Gates hypothesized that glia could direct neurons around the damaged area of the brain. His findings were published in the February 1999 issue of Neuron, neuroscience's most respected journal.

Now an international leader in research on the brain's circuitry, Gates has received more than $350,000 in grants from the Parkinson's Disease Society since 2001 to fund his research. He has made countless presentations to scholarly organizations, written several chapters in scientific books and published numerous papers for such distinguished professional journals as the European Journal of Neurosciences.

Among his many honors, Gates was APSU's Outstanding Young Alumnus of 1999, in recognition of his scientific achievements. He has been an invited lecturer in medical neuroscience at King's College, London, and served on the Animal Ethical Review Committee, Cardiff University. During 2001-03, he was responsible for overseeing human research for the local government. He is on the United Kingdom's Parkinson's Disease Society Tissue Bank Management Board and directs the Brain Repair Group Seminars, Group Talks and Journal Club.

Gate's fellow scientist and classmate, Timothy Fox, returned to APSU last December to give the Winter Commencement keynote address. Fox graduated from APSU in 1990 with a major in physics and a minor in math and computer science.

In 1992, he earned a Master of Science in Radiological Engineering and Health Physics and, in 1994, a Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering, both from Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta.

Besides his academic appointment as assistant professor of radiation oncology at Emory University School of Medicine, Fox is the director of the Division of Medical Physics and the Division of Computational Research and Informatics, both within Emory University School of Medicine's Department of Radiation Oncology.

Fox was named a Diplomate of the American Board of Radiology for Therapeutic Radiologic Physics. Among his many fellowships, scholarships and other special appointments, Fox received the 1990 Ohio Valley Conference Scholar-Athlete Award. He is a member of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the American Association of Physics in Medicine.

During 1996-99, he served on the Computer Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. He is on the Long-Range Planning Committee for Emory Medical School's Department of Radiation Oncology and Emory University's Radiation Safety Committee.

Fox served as editor of the Vascular Radiotherapy Monitor from 1998-02. He is a manuscript reviewer for the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Physics in Medicine and Biology and Medical Physics.

A member of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Fox has authored many successful grants, written book reviews and made presentations at professional meetings.

Fox's research centers on techniques that enable software systems to perform intelligently and exhibit goal-directed behavior in a clinical environment. For a current project, Fox established a collaborative research program with both the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the College of Computing at Georgia Tech.

The primary developer of seven computer programs, Fox holds two U.S. patents on systems and methods for providing radiation therapy.

For more information, please contact Dr. Linda Thompson, professor of nursing and PKP president, by telephone at (931) 221-7469 or e-mail thompsonl@apsu.edu.
—Dennie Burke