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Summer and Fall 2015 Courses

Summer 2015

PSY 3210: Psychology of Women (3 credits)

Examination of developmental characteristics of women, myths and stereotypes, sex roles, sexuality, lifestyles, values, achievement, motivation, power, mental health, and mental disorders in women. The empirical study of psychological issues of women will be emphasized.

Deborah Buchanan, Psychology                                                                                                                                           Web


 Fall 2015

WGS 2050: Women and Culture - Service Learning Section (3 credits)

Prerequisite: ENGL 1020

An introduction to fundamental principlas of women's studies; the cultural construction of gender; the cultural roles, depictions and experiences of women, past and present; and the impact of feminist movements nationally and internationally.  Service Learning Project included.

Jill Eichhorn, Women's and Gender Studies                                                       TR 11:10-12:35pm

Beatrix Brockman, Women's and Gender Studies                                              Web

Taylor Emery, Women's and Gender Studies (Fort Campbell I)                        TR 11:15-1:45pm



WGS 2060: Introduction to LGBTQ Studies - Service Learning Section (3 credits)

Prerequisite: ENGL 1020

Explores conceptions of gender, sexuality, and sexual orientation and critically assesses traditions and their effects on social policy, popular culture, law and gevernment, science and politics.  REading and research includes history, social studies, activist publications, memoir and film. Service Learning Project included. 

Barbara Lee Gray, Women's and Gender Studies                                            MWF 12:20-1:15 pm


WGS 3070: Women and Film (3 credits)

Prerequisites: WGS 2050 or WGS 2060 or ENG 2070 or cOOMM 3950 or SOC 1010

This coruse examines women as subjects and objects in film, and women film-makers.  Emphasis will be placed on analyzing films for constructions of gener, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, and class.

Jill Eichhorn, Women's and Gender Studies                                                    MW 2:30 - 3:55 pm


SOC 3080: Gender & Sexualities -  (3 credits)

Gender and sexuality in American society and cross-culturally, with consideration to the role of gender in structuring identity, male/female interaction, and constraints on expanding opportunities.

Jonniann Butterfield, Sociology                                                                                                                     Web


HHP 3410: Health Disparities (3 credits)

Prerequisite: HHP 2050, WS 2050, 2000-level sociology courses, or permission of the instructor.

Examines the role of gender, race/ethnicity, and class on health status and access to health care in the U.S.

Melissa Gomez, Health and Human Performance (2 sections)                  TR 8:00am - 9:25 am & 11:10 - 12:35 pm


HHP 4080: Psychology Aspects of Human Sexuality (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of department chair.

The focus is on the human or personal aspect of sexuality. Emphasis is placed on attitudes, emotions, and behavior patterns as related to the development of healthy sexual lifestyles rather than on the anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system. Students are encouraged to integrate their own life experiences with the academic materials.

Lisa Lewis, Health & Human Performance                                                  MWF 12:20 - 1:15 pm


POLS 4340: Family Law (3 credits)

Examination of the legal issues involved in marriage, divorce, child custody, child support, and adoption.

Julia North, Political Science                                                                                                           TR 12:45 - 2:10 pm


COMM 5810: Race, Gender and Mass Media (3 credits)

Prerequisites: junior standing

Examination of current and historical portrayals of ethnic minorities and men and women in media news, entertainment, and advertising; and discussion of research into the influence of these portrayals on audience attitudes.

Yvonne Prather, Communications                                                                                      Web