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APSU celebrates African American History Month

2/4/2002
February 4, 2002

Celebrate African American History Month with staff in the African American Cultural Center at Austin Peay State University. Events reflect the theme, "The Color Line Revisited: Is Racism Dead?"

The schedule includes the following:

Feb. 4: "New Perspectives: African American Student Art Exhibit and Opening Reception" features art from African American students enrolled in the APSU department of art and recent alumni. The annual African American History Month art exhibit was inspired by Dr. Donald Joyce, dean of the Felix G. Woodward Library from 1986 until his death in 2001. This year's exhibit is dedicated to his memory and will be displayed in the library throughout February.

Feb. 5: "Roots, Part II" will be shown at noon in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the television series, followed by an informal discussion.

Feb. 6: "African American Perspectives on Graphic Design and Advertising" begins at noon in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center. APSU graphic design alumni Chris Lewis, Jocelyn Morris and Lisa Smith, together with Dr. Yvonne Prather, assistant professor and director of television studies, and Dr. Cynthia Marsh, chair of the department of art, will conduct a panel discussion on experiences of African Americans in the advertising industry.

Feb. 6: "African History and Tradition" features Middle Tennessee State University faculty member and Africana studies scholar Dr. Adonijah Bakari, who will address some of the African cultural retentions found in African American contemporary life. The discussion begins at 6 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center.

Feb. 7: "Is It Really Worth It? Protect Your Heart and Your Body" is an in-depth discussion on sexually transmitted diseases led by health-care professionals from the Clarksville Department of Public Health. The forum begins at 4:30 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center.

Feb. 8: "Roots, Part III" will be shown at 6 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center, followed by an informal discussion.

Feb. 8: "The Spot: Celebrating Our Achievements" includes a variety of unique and entertaining activities to help participants relax and enjoy the achievement of African Americans. The celebration begins at 9 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center.

Feb. 12: "What Brothers Think, What Sistahs Know: The Real Deal on Love and Relationships" is an insightful presentation on African American male/female relationships led by husband and wife team Denene Millner and Nick Chiles, co-authors of the newly published book "What Brothers Think, What Sistahs Know." The program begins at 7 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center.

Feb. 13: "Practicing Harmonious and Balanced African American Marital Relationships" begins at 6 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center. Motivational speaker and Clarksville community cultural worker Yusef Rahz discusses how the tradition of Ma'at can be applied to modern day African American marital relationships. The presentation focuses on several of the 42 principles of the Harmony and Balance philosophy, created and practiced by the ancient African of Kemet in Egypt.

Feb. 14: "Reading Across the African American Heritage, Part I" is designed to promote literacy on local, regional and national levels. Led by Dr. Mary Warner, assistant professor of developmental studies, a "reading chain" of African American literacy works will be conducted by faculty and students as part of the 13th annual, nationwide African American Read-In. The read-in will be held from 9-11 a.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center.

Feb. 14: "Roots, Part IV" will be shown at 6 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center, followed by an informal discussion.

Feb. 15: "Hair: The Great Racial Divide" is a discussion of the complexities and interrelatedness of racism and sexism and the impact of these social phenomena on African American aesthetics and concepts of beauty. Led by Dr. Carolivia Herron, internationally acclaimed author of the controversial book "Nappy Hair" and former professor of literature at Harvard, the discussion begins at 7 p.m. in the Gentry Auditorium. (See article to follow.)

Feb. 17: "The Woman Behind the Gold: Wilma Glodean Rudolph," a video documenting the life and accomplishments of Olympic gold medalist Wilma G. Rudolph, will be shown at 4:30 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center. Dr. Yvonne Prather, assistant professor and director of television studies, will discuss her video documentary. Rudolph's friends, family members and professional colleagues will share personal anecdotes of this great American sports champion's life and legacy.

Feb. 19: "Roots, Part V" will be shown at noon in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center, followed by an informal discussion.

Feb. 20: "Reading Across the African American Heritage, Part II" is a continuation of the University's official involvement in the 2002 African American Read-In project. The read-in will be held from 2-4 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center.

Feb. 20: "Banking and Investment Options in the African American Community" is an informative presentation on successful business practices. Led by Connie Fenccroy-Milan, a local retail sales specialist, and Vincent M. Jenkins of Edward Jones Investments, the lecture focuses on the techniques of prosperous African American entrepreneurship. The presentation begins at 6 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center.

Feb. 21: "The Wind Done Gone" is a novel written by Alice Randall that imagines an alternate version of what life might have been like for African Americans living in the Atlanta of "Gone with the Wind." Dr. Dwonna Goldstone, assistant professor of languages and literature, reviews Randall's novel from noon-1 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center. Prior reading of the book is unnecessary. Participants are encouraged to bring a lunch and join in the discussion.

Feb. 23: "Shaping African American Racial Identity: Agonies and Ecstasy" is a lecture on the theoretical underpinnings of African American racial identity formation. Led by Dr. Raymond Winbush, director of the Fisk University Race Relations Institute, the lecture is part of the AAST 3021, Seminar in African American Studies series. The lecture begins at noon, and reservations are required. Contact Dr. Nancy Dawson at (931) 221-7106 or DawsonN@apsu.edu.

Feb. 23: "Roots, Part VI" will be shown at 6:30 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center, followed by an informal discussion.

Feb. 23: "The Spot: Celebrating Our Achievements" includes a variety of unique and entertaining activities designed to engage participants in taking pleasure from the achievements of African Americans. The celebration begins at 9:30 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center.

Feb. 26: Dance of Color: "Dealing With Drugs" is a depiction of various issues of today's drug culture and the pressures placed on youth in relation to this social enigma. Performed by the African American student drama and dance troupe, the program begins at 7 p.m. in the Clement Auditorium.

Feb. 27: "African Origins of the Universe" begins at 6 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center. Led by Kilindi Iyi, noted teacher and advocate of the ancient African martial arts tradition, the discussion
focuses on creation stories from African cultural belief systems.

Feb. 28: "Celebrating Our Hard Won Selves, Part II" is the culminating event of African American History Month. The program features a discussion by APSU students Latanya Kitchen and Julian Ewing on their recent adventure as yearlong interns at Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla. The discussion begins at 7 p.m. in the Harambee Room of the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center, followed by an Ending Gala to celebrate the holistic African American experience.
For more information about any of these events, telephone the African American Cultural Center at 7120.