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Activities slated for Black History Month; Most events free, open to public

1/30/2007
Austin Peay State University faculty, staff and students have planned a varied list of activities to commemorate Black History Month in February. Most are free and open to APSU and the Clarksville communities.

Tuesday, Feb. 6—APSU Black History Bowl, 6 p.m., Morgan University Center (MUC) 303-305. Sponsored by NAACP College Chapter and STEA.

Thursday, Feb. 8—donnie betts presents “Music Is My Life, Politics My Mistress,” 7-9 p.m., MUC 303-305. Film screening and discussion on musician-activist Oscar Brown Jr. Sponsored by the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.

Friday, Feb. 9—African Family Night Dinner, 6-8 p.m., African American Cultural Center. Open to APSU faculty, staff and students only. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

Friday, Feb. 9—Film: “Hotel Rwanda,” 8 p.m., Clement Auditorium. Sponsored by the Office of Student Life and Leadership. First 75 APSU students receive free T-shirt. (Valid college I.D. must be presented.) This film is based on the true story of Paul Rusesabagina, the man who refused to ignore the atrocities suffered by the people of Rwanda. As the violence escalated, he opened his hotel to offer shelter to thousands in need. Rated PG-13.

Tuesday, Feb. 13—Remembering Slavery: Readings of Slave Narratives, 7 p.m., African American Cultural Center. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

Thursday, Feb. 15-Thursday, March 8—Slavery in America: A More Complete Story Exhibit. Woodward Library. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

Thursday, Feb. 15—“More than Music: Hip Hop Music and Its Impact on Society,” Dr. Jeffrey Menzise, Fisk University. 3:30-5 p.m, African American Cultural Center. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

Thursday, Feb. 15—“Spoken Word Performance: Naima Jamaal and Heru,” 7 p.m., Clement Auditorium. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

Sunday, Feb. 18—“Musical Traditions from the African American Experience,” 6 p.m., Clement Auditorium. Guest performers include The Mosaic Singers from Detroit, Mich. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

Monday, Feb. 19-Friday, Feb. 23—“I'll Make Me a World: Video Series,” noon, African American Cultural Center. This video series tells the experiences of African-Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

Tuesday, Feb. 20—“1,001 Black Inventions,” 7 p.m., Clement Auditorium. This play takes you into the lives of a typical American family attempting to survive in a world without inventions created by Africans and African-Americans. Through humorous events, they come to realize black ingenuity is an integral part of everyday life.

Wednesday, Feb. 21—Film: “When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts,” 7 p.m., African American Cultural Center. A year after Hurricane Katrina decimated New Orleans, director Spike Lee presents a four-hour, four-part chronicle that recounts, through words and images, one of our country's most profound natural disasters, starting with the hours leading up to the arrival of Katrina. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

Thursday, Feb. 22—Film screening: “Belly of the Basin,” 7 p.m., Clement Auditorium. Two independent filmmakers document life after Katrina. Question-and-answer session follows. Sponsored by the African American Cultural Center.

For more information, contact the Wilbur N. Daniel African American Cultural Center by telephone at (931) 221-7120. -- Dennie B. Burke