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Graduate Courses in History

3 
Description: Students examine methods of research and modes of writing in history. This course prepares students to write seminar papers and master’s thesis and conduct research in archives, databases, internet resources, government documents and other bibliographic aids. The course is interactive and online for Web-based instruction.

3 
Description: Students study the character of warfare in the ancient Mediterranean world, specific wars fought by Greeks, Romans, and others; such as, the Persian Wars, the Peloponnesian War, the Punic Wars, the Gallic War, and the Roman civil wars. The Works of Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius, Caesar, Sallust, and Livy will be included.

3 
Description: Description: This course examines influences of the Scientific Revolution and Renaissance thoughts on military capabilities and their roles in building stronger European states. Students will learn how weapon advancements, fortification developments, and organizational changes all facilitated increased military forces, which in turn enabled certain European states to consolidate power and expand their influence.

3 
Description: Description: Examines campaigns and major battles, strategy, logistics, and tactics of the War of American Independence. Political, diplomatic, cultural, and social contexts of the war considered. Eighteenth century perspectives of the military in a republic, uses of militia or irregulars, the meaning and impact of sustained warfare on institutions and thought. 
3 
Description: Description: Explores the political, social and economic causes of the war, also the impact the war had on the home fronts of both North and South. Considers what effect the Northern implementation of “total war” had on civilian morale and the impact of African-American troops in the military.
3 
Description: This course investigates the U. S. Army’s role in the development of the Trans-Mississippi West. Students examine military contributions to exploration. Native American relations, Hispanic relations, economic development, transportation, public health, diplomacy and national policy are examined. The military’s roles as both the forerunner of Anglo-American civilization and the mediator with Native and Hispanic cultures are discussed. 
3 
Description: Students examine The Great War as the beginning of the 20th century wars and end of a Europe-centered world. The course includes military dimensions of the struggle - land, sea and air battles fought on three continents. Students choose research topic varying from military, economic, social, artistic, intellectual and diplomatic subjects.
3 
Description: Operations, tactics, arms, intelligence and strategies employed by the major combatants are examined. Principle historiographical questions on topics such as Pearl Harbor attack and ethical implications of the atomic bombs use receive special attention, along with the American military’s role as an engine for democracy during the post-war occupations.
3 
Description: Key problems, sources, bibliography and research methods of the early Cold War are explored. The course includes a breakdown of the World War II alliance, the Korean War and emerging strategies of nuclear deterrence and guerrilla warfare.
3 
Description: This course highlights the Vietnam conflict, the Reagan defense buildup and Operation Desert Storm. In addition, the impact of the Vietnam experience on the American political, economic and social landscapes during and after war will be considered.
3 
Description: This course is an examination of the conflicts, crises and politics of the Cold War with special emphases on the German-Berlin problem, the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Middle East wars. Primary sources will be augmented with scholarly analyses and contemporary accounts to afford political and social perspectives.
3 
Description: This course explores the many strains of thought and political and technological developments that came together to make Germany a mighty power. Militarism, nationalism, autocracy, industrialism, totalitarianism and democracy are all themes featured as student examine how and why Germany gained such prominence.
3 
Description: Students investigate the uses of naval power in peace and war since 1900, using a comparative approach to naval leadership, strategy, tactics, technology, joint operations and social and cultural contexts. The navies of Great Britain, Germany, Imperial Japan, the Soviet Union and the United States receive the closest scrutiny.
3 
Description: This course includes analysis of interaction between the civilian population and the military during war. Students examine contributions and resistance of minority groups and women along with economic, political, social and cultural changes brought about by military conflicts. Primary sources, including diaries, letters and speeches, newspapers and magazines, present a picture of each crisis.
3 
Description: Historical practice and ethical reflection suggest that military action by one state against another has moral limits. This course addresses both the question of when a country can justly go to war and what is ethically required of participants within a war. 
3 
Description: Students investigate Holy war (ethnic cleansing) in Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The course includes examination of beliefs, values and historical traditions shared by religions and analyzes the theologies of war and peace in the Tenakh, the New Testament and the Quarn. Student also examine the fundamentalist “Battle for God” in these religions, concluding with an analysis of extremist groups.
3 
Description: This course addresses non-combat roles performed by the U.S. military. The occupation of Germany and Japan after World War II, state building and peacekeeping missions around the globe are evaluated. Course content includes focus on democratization and cultural reorientation through political, educational, economic and cultural institutions.
3 
Description: This course focuses on the evolution of special operations forces during and since World War II. To the extent possible, anti-terrorist and clandestine measures by and in conjunction with military forces are examined first-hand using unclassified sources and scholarly assessments.
3 
Description: Description: Students examine terrorism and other forms of unconventional warfare, including goals and methods of psychological, chemical and biological warfare. The ideal logical foundations of political, economic and social conditions associated with terrorist activities are analyzed.
3 
Description: This course is a study of Islam that explores history. The life of Muhammed, the Quran and Hadiths, the Five Pillars, basic beliefs and values, diversions of war and peace, Islamic philosophy and the relationship among Judaism, Christianity and Islam are included in the course content.
3 
Description: This course examines the history of American foreign policy with an emphasis on major wars (the World Wars, Korea, Vietnam and Persian Gulf), secondary conflicts overseas (Grenada, Panama), guerrilla combat (Philippine Insurrection, early Vietnam) and covert action (Cuba, Nicaragua, Iran, Guatemala).
3 
Description: This course is designated to treat a variety of specialized topics. The professor and student can collaborate on specificity based on professor’s area of expertise and student’s needs. May be taken twice for a total of 6 semester hours.
3 
Description: To be taken twice for a total of 6 semester hours.
3 
Description: This course includes readings in military history from ancient times to the present. Of particular interest are the impact of military thought on operations and the relationship between the military and society.
3 
Description: The development of military strategy, tactics, and technology in Europe from the French Revolution to the end of World War II.
3 
Description: The development and employment in peace and war of American Military Power on land and at sea from the American Revolution to the end of World War I.
3 
Description: The development and employment in peace and war of American Military Power on land, at sea and in the air since World War I.
3 
Description: In these courses, student will examine a specific historical topic in detail.  Students will become deeply familiar with the sources, historiography and approaches to that particular topic.  The topic will vary with the professor offering them.
6 
Description: Student will conduct research and write a thesis under supervision of designated faculty committee.
3 
Description: This course will cover the history of the samurai class from its creation in the 8th-10th centuries to its dissolution in the 19th century. The rise of the samurai; the Gempel War; shogunal rule; the Warring States period; the Three Unifers; and the development of the bushido code.
3 
Description: This course examines warfare in the western tradition from the breakup of the Roman Empire (400 A.D.) to the rise of the modern nation state (1500 A.D.). The focus is on the development of military institutions and covers early feudal conflict, the Crusades and the 100 Years’ War. 
3 
Description: This course examines the role of airpower in conflict since the beginning of manned flight. Included are the evolution of airpower technology and theory and their application in conflict.
3 
Description: Warfare taxes the resources and finances of the nation-state in unprecedented ways.  This course examines macroeconomic linkages between the military and society including fiscal and monetary policy and inflation in the U. S. from the Civil War to the Gulf War.  It includes logistics supply and market distortions in command economies.
3 
Description: This course traces the evolution of warfare in Latin America and the role of the military in Latin American society.  Major topics will include the major wars of the 19th century; the major 20th century Revolutions (Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua); and the military regimes of the 20th century.
3 
Description: This is a readings seminar that will examine the Vietnam War (1945-1975).  Students will be introduced to the historiography of the conflict and gaininsight into some of the war’s major social, political, economic and military issues through selected readings of primary and secondary sources and class discussions.
4 
Description: This course will study the concept, emergence, and implementation of the strategy that became the plan for the creation of the Russian Empire.  In addition to examining major conflicts, this course will also study the training of officers, the induction of soldiers, and the technological base of the Russian military from 1613-present.
3 
Description:  This course will introduce students to the major historiographical relevant to the early North American experience.  In addition to military issues, it will delve into imperial, constitutional, economic, religious questions from 1492-1865.
3 
Description: This course will introduce students to major historiographical arguments relevant to US history since 1865.  It will delve into the growth of the US as a world power and explore divergent historical arguments of major historical periods.
3 
Description: War has served as the subject of film since before the First World War.  This class uses the film medium to examine war as a reflection of society’s values and as a means of preserving the memory of war for future generations.
3 
Description: This course will use the “grate books” of historical schoarship to introduce students to the major themes, questions and theories of the historian’s craft.  The student will learn how to conduct historical criticism and develop historical arguments.
3 
Cross Listed: HIST 4580;
Description: United States history from the onset of the Great Depression to the promise of a New Frontier; an examination of the New Deal-Fair Deal programs and legacies in American life, and the international issues which created World War II and its aftermaths; and the Cold War. 
3 
Cross Listed: HIST 4590;
Description: United States history from the New Frontier to the Reagan Presidency; the Freedom Struggle; Civil Rights movements; cultural shifts and legacies in American life.
3 
Cross Listed: HIST 4620;
Description: A synthesis of the economic, social, political, and cultural developments that shaped the history of southern states from the Colonial period after 1607 to the secession crisis of 1860-61.
3 
Cross Listed: HIST 4630;
Description: The historic development of the South from 1861 to the present, from the trauma of Civil War and the First Reconstruction thrugh the Second Reconstruction of the 1960s and the creation of the modern South.
3 
Cross Listed: HIST 4660;
Description: This course covers the events and historiography of the African-American experience since 1890.  Students will conduct research in primary sources, learn how interpretations of this period have evolved, and track the development of the subfield of African-American history.
3 
Cross Listed: HIST 4670;
Description: The roles of women in the social, economic, and political development of the United States.  Contributions of women and the historical significance of their attitudes in the liberal reform eras in American history.
 

3 
Cross Listed: HIST 4770;
Description: Comparison and contrast among the Spanish Borderlands, New France, Louisana, New Netherland, Russian American, English American, and United States frontiers, exploring their contrasts, continuity, and legacies.

3 
Description: This course surveys the contributions and roles of African Americans in American military history from the Revolutionary War to the present.
3 
Description: This course is for Graduate Students to have the opportunity to participate in a grounded experience with a museum or historic site.
3 
Description: This course is for Graduate Students to have the opportunity to write a paper suitable for submission to satisfy the research literacy requirement.
 3 
Prerequisite: Milestone II 
Description: Emphasis on developing skills in unit development; lesson planning and modification for diverse learners; individualized instruction; questioning and formal discussions; teaching critical thinking, reading in the content fields, and effective strategies; formative and summative assessment; and classroom management. A minimum of 15 hours of field experience is required.
1 
Description: For students not fulfilling graduate school research literacy requirement within one year after completion of course work. Enrollment required each subsequent semester. Tuition and fees for one credit hour must be paid every semester until research requirement is met. 
3-6 
Description: This course is for graduate students to have the opportunity to participate on Study Abroad Programs.