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Derrick Tims in library

Derrick Tims

“To me, being a “Gov” means that you constantly challenge yourself to be better than you were the day before.”
Major: Psychology
Hometown: Alberta, Alabama
Involvement: Golden Key International Honor Society; Alpha Sigma Lambda Honor Society; Psi Chi/ Psychology Club; Phi Kappa Phi; Omicron Delta Kappa

The recommendation of a friend brought senior psychology major Derrick Tims to Austin Peay State University, but it has been the experiences and personal connections the former soldier has made during his time here that make Tims proud to be a Gov.

“I knew I needed to advance myself after leaving the military, and my best friend received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Austin Peay and spoke very highly of the institution and its psychology department,” Tims said. “Since I’ve been here, I’ve found I like the friendly and accepting environment the most; the faculty and staff that I have worked with have been very approachable and caring.”

Tims’ courses in Austin Peay’s Department of Psychological Science and Counseling have worked together to show him the path to his future. One early course in career development in psychology, Tims said, helped him find what degrees he would need to work as a career counselor, while an intro to clinical counseling class helped prepare him for life in the field.

“Both of those courses are examples of how (Austin Peay) has helped me feel more confident in my ability to find the right position after the completion of my master’s degree,” Tims said.

Tims is involved in a number of organizations on campus, volunteering his time and experience to help the campus community.

Besides working in the Center for Teaching and Learning, he also serves as an APSU 1000 Peer Leader, and has been a member of honor organizations including Golden Key International Honor Society and the Alpha Sigma Lambda non-traditional student and Omicron Delta Kappa national leadership honor societies.

“I developed strong leadership skills in the military, but I quickly realized that college calls for a different style of leadership,” Tims said. “In the military, leadership was more goal orientated, but in college, leadership is people-centric. I have learned that being a good leader is not about being able to tell people what to do; being a leader is about showing how things are possible and mentoring others as they take their own paths to success.”