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Award-winning Poet Keplinger to Speak at APSU March 17

          CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. – Young poets looking for a bit of writing advice would do well to establish a few criteria when seeking out a mentor. First, it’s always best to listen to someone who has published at least one book of verse. Second, make sure the poet in question has a few major awards. Third, and most important, try to find an individual that you can actually meet in person.

          CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. – Young poets looking for a bit of writing advice would do well to establish a few criteria when seeking out a mentor. First, it’s always best to listen to someone who has published at least one book of verse. Second, make sure the poet in question has a few major awards. Third, and most important, try to find an individual that you can actually meet in person.

         Following a criterion such as this will usually ensure that you receive only high quality advice. And, luckily for any young poets in the area, someone possessing all three of the above credentials is stopping by Austin Peay State University later this month.

          At 11 a.m. on March 17, the award-winning poet and translator David Keplinger will visit the campus’ Honors Commons to deliver a free talk, “The Poet as With-ness: Writing from your Largest Self.” The event is part of the APSU Honors Lecture Series. 

             Keplinger is the author of three collections of poetry, including “The Prayers of Others,” which won the Colorado Book Award, “The Rose Inside,” winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize, and the acclaimed collection “The Clearing.”

         “’The Clearing’ is a distinctive collection of poems that seems to invent—before our eyes—a new metaphysics in poetry,” poet Bruce Weigl said.

           Keplinger has received grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the SOROS Foundation, the Academy of American Poets and the Katey Lehman Foundation. From 1995 until 1997 he taught at Gymnazium Petra Bezruc in Frydek-Mistek (Czech Republic) and creative writing at the University of Ostrava.

        His essays on creative writing pedagogy, now a book-in-progress, have appeared in The American Voice, Teacher Writers, AGNI, Radical Pedagogy, Theory and Science, and in various anthologies. His co-translations with Danish poet Carsten Rene Nielsen, “World Cut Out with Crooked Scissors,” appeared in 2007.

       For more information on the Honors Lecture Series, contact the APSU Honors Program at 221-7119.