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Young Composers Competition winners announced

The Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts and the department of music at APSU have announced the 2004 winners of the 18th Annual Young Composers Competition.

The competition encourages young composers by providing professional-level performances of their music, as well as a financial incentive, with the hope that this professional recognition will create a greater awareness of these young composers.

Dan Visconti, Cleveland, won first place and $1,000 for his Black Bend for string quartet. He is pursuing his Master of Music at the Cleveland Institute of Music.
The Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts and the department of music at APSU have announced the 2004 winners of the 18th Annual Young Composers Competition.

The competition encourages young composers by providing professional-level performances of their music, as well as a financial incentive, with the hope that this professional recognition will create a greater awareness of these young composers.

Dan Visconti, Cleveland, won first place and $1,000 for his “Black Bend” for string quartet. He is pursuing his Master of Music at the Cleveland Institute of Music.

Visconti's music is often influenced by popular music, though he remains interested in aspects of rock, blues and jazz less explored by those with a minimalist bent. As a composer, he's been influenced by early ecclesiastical music and '60s psychedelic rock: "There's a strength, a freshness that I'd like to capture and make part of the contemporary classical concert experience again, a feeling of excitement and inevitability,” he says.

His previous honors include a BMI Student Composer Award, two consecutive first-place awards in the ASCAP/Victor Herbert Young Composers Competition, the NFMC Devora Nadworney Award for Vocal Writing, the 2004 BMI Foundation Boudleaux Bryant Commission and a residency at Copland House. Recent commissions include works for the Moore/Better Duo, the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra, and the Cleveland Museum of Art's AKI Festival. He is currently working on a commission from the BMI Foundation.

Russell Nadel, Baltimore, took second and $400 for “Serenata,” a duet for flute and guitar. He is a senior at the Peabody Conservatory of Music of Johns Hopkins University, working on a five-year bachelor's/master's program with a double major in music composition and music education.

George Lam, Baltimore, came in third for “Serenade” for solo flute. He is pursuing his Master of Music in composition and music theory pedagogy at the Peabody Conservatory of Music of Johns Hopkins University. Lam won $100.
—Rebecca Mackey