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Writer-in-residence Monica Wood to give reading from her new novel

APSUs Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts presents a reading by writer-in-residence, Monica Wood.

Author of Any Bitter Thing, Wood will be reading from her new novel at 8 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 8, in the Gentry Auditorium, Kimbrough Building. A reception and book signing will follow.

There also will be an informal discussion at 11:15 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 9, in Harned Hall, room 240.
APSU's Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts presents a reading by writer-in-residence, Monica Wood.

Author of “Any Bitter Thing,” Wood will be reading from her new novel at 8 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 8, in the Gentry Auditorium, Kimbrough Building. A reception and book signing will follow.

There also will be an informal discussion at 11:15 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 9, in Harned Hall, room 240.

Wood is the author of three novels. Her short story, “Ernie's Ark,” won the 1999 Pushcart Prize. Speaking of Wood, Andre Dubus III, the author of “House of Sand and Fog” and “Bluesman,“ said, “With luminous and graceful prose,

Monica Wood has brilliantly captured the human need to love, the heart's desire to nurture and the soul's urge to sacrifice. I know of no other writer who can take on this subject and make it both funny and moving, entertaining yet utterly transcendent. This is a wise and loving book.”

Wood says many writers and books have inspired her, but when she was a younger writer, author Raymond Carver had a huge influence on her. “I had a big thing for Carver because what he did looked so easy. It really wasn't.”

For Wood, storytelling not only had a huge influence on her as an author, but also played a vital role in her family's tradition. “In my family, the idea of story, and how you told it, took hold early because I come from an Irish tradition that can turn the smallest moment into the longest tale.

“If you scratch the surface of almost any family, you'll find a history contained in a few oft-told tales. For most people, these stories are enough. But for the writer in the family, the question arises, ‘Why these stories and not some other stories?' In my new novel, a character says, ‘The human craving is for story, not truth.' I believe that, too.”

Wood will meet with various creative writing students while visiting APSU.
Her reading is free and open to the public.

For more information, telephone Susan Wallace at (931) 221-7031. —Crissy Laubach