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This week in higher ed

•Instead of obsessively checking their mailboxes for those college acceptance letters, many high school students are obsessively checking their e-mail as more colleges are choosing to e-mail acceptance letters or give students a password to check admissions status online. (Chicago Tribune, 4/20/04)
•Instead of obsessively checking their mailboxes for those college acceptance letters, many high school students are obsessively checking their e-mail as more colleges are choosing to e-mail acceptance letters or give students a password to check admissions status online. (Chicago Tribune, 4/20/04)

•They are coming—more than 40 million of them. New college applicants represent the start of the “baby-boom echo”—the largest generation of teenagers the U.S. has ever seen. The generation will peak in 2009, when the biggest high school graduating class the country has ever seen hits 3.2 million. The trend will continue through 2018. (Rocky Mountain News, 4/21/04)

•At prestigious universities nationwide, from flagship state colleges to the Ivy League, more students from upper-income families are edging out those from the middle class. More members of the freshman class at the University of Michigan have parents making at least $200,000 a year than have parents making less than the national median of about $53,000. At the most selective private schools, more fathers of freshmen are doctors than are hourly workers, teachers, clergy members, farmers or members of the military—combined. (The New York Times, 4/22/04)

•The governor of Virginia has pledged $2 million to fund scholarships for students denied an education when public schools across the state closed rather than integrate in the late 1950s. (Los Angeles Times, 4/22/04)

•As the University of California at Berkeley suffers fiscal crisis, private schools like Harvard and MIT are pursuing the university's best faculty with salaries sometimes 25-30 percent higher than UC Berkeley's. (Contra Costa Times, 4/22/04)

•Movie studios, record labels and technology companies have been testing a new Automated Copyright Notice System (ACNS) designed to remove suspected file swappers from campus networks. The technology promises to make copyright enforcement easier on peer-to-peer networks, saving schools and Internet service providers time and money. (CNET News.com)