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This week in higher ed

•Duke University is cutting 8 a.m. classes and trying to come up with other ways to help its sleep-deprived students. One idea under consideration is a new orientation program for freshmen on the importance of sleep. (Associated Press)

•The chairman of the state Board of Education in Massachusetts has formed a task force to investigate why graduation rates at state colleges are below the national average. State college six-year graduation rates average between 41 and 45 percent, below the national rate of 54 percent. (Boston Globe)
•Duke University is cutting 8 a.m. classes and trying to come up with other ways to help its sleep-deprived students. One idea under consideration is a new orientation program for freshmen on the importance of sleep. (Associated Press)

•The chairman of the state Board of Education in Massachusetts has formed a task force to investigate why graduation rates at state colleges are below the national average. State college six-year graduation rates average between 41 and 45 percent, below the national rate of 54 percent. (Boston Globe)

•Due to changes in the state's Monetary Award Program, nearly 4,000 students at Illinois' private colleges and universities will see their financial aid packages reduced as their state grants are cut or eliminated. (Chicago Tribune)

•A year after hiking tuition 15 percent at the state's four research universities, Georgia's Board of Regents received requests from presidents of these and other state schools for more increases. The University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, Georgia State and are asking for an average tuition increase of 10 percent for 2004-05, but Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor said the hikes could kill the HOPE Scholarship program. (Macon Telegraph)

•The University of Pittsburgh is investigating allegations that professors in the school's communication department routinely have consensual sexual relationships with graduate students. (Observer-Reporter)