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This week in higher ed

•For the first time in the history of higher education, women outnumber men on four-year campuses by a wide margin. In 2003, 712,000 women earned a bachelors degree, compared with 531,000 men. More women also received two-year associate degrees and masters degree than men. (AZCentral.com)
•For the first time in the history of higher education, women outnumber men on four-year campuses by a wide margin. In 2003, 712,000 women earned a bachelor's degree, compared with 531,000 men. More women also received two-year associate degrees and master's degree than men. (AZCentral.com)

•The Recording Industry Association of America is continuing its crackdown on illegal downloading. Last Tuesday, the RIA filed 89 lawsuits against individuals using university networks. Universities targeted include New York University, Georgetown, the University of Michigan, Stanford and the University of California at Berkeley. (StreamingMediaiq)

•Although critics call the University of Phoenix “McUniversity” and “Drive Thru-U,” the nation's largest private university is only getting bigger. On a mission to turn quality higher education into a lucrative business, the university's parent company, the Apollo Group, boasts a market capitalization larger than Southwest Airlines. (The Kansas City Star)

•Only four schools in March Madness' Sweet Sixteen—Duke, Kansas, Vanderbilt and Xavier—posted athlete graduation rates of 50 percent or better. Sixteen teams in the tournament's initial 65 had grad rates of 25 percent or less. Four hadn't graduated a player in six years, according to the National Collegiate Athletic Association. (The New York Times)

•More than 40 percent of this year's college freshmen applied to schools without visiting them. A group of independent college guidance advisers are videotaping the official campus tours at 350 colleges and universities. The tapes are 90 minutes and cost $15. (Akron Beacon Journal)

•Three University of Wisconsin students have filed a class action lawsuit against 24 Madison bars for conspiring to fix prices on alcohol. The suit is aimed at a university effort to eliminate weekend drink specials. The suit claims the bars instead committed felony violations of state and federal antitrust laws and names the University of Wisconsin-Madison as a participant. (Washington Times)

•The state of Connecticut has failed to pay $25 million in matching endowment grants to schools in the state university system for more than two years and may suspend the program for the next two years. (The Boston Globe)

•The Princeton Review (http://www.princetonreview.com) is offering streaming video for admissions marketing. DePaul University is the first client to use the service, which allows prospective students to see a video clip while researching information on the site.