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This Week in Higher Ed

•The Faculty Senate at George Mason University has passed a resolution denouncing the Patriot Act. GMU professors say the law could mute debate and research at all institutions of higher education. (WJLA.com, 4/15/05)

•In an attempt to curb violence on campuses, companies are developing panic button devices that can be carried on a key ring or pendant. When pressed, the button sends a signal–sometimes through the nearest blue-light station–that alerts campus security officials. (Associated Press, 4/14/05)
•The Faculty Senate at George Mason University has passed a resolution denouncing the Patriot Act. GMU professors say the law could mute debate and research at all institutions of higher education. (WJLA.com, 4/15/05)

•In an attempt to curb violence on campuses, companies are developing “panic button” devices that can be carried on a key ring or pendant. When pressed, the button sends a signal—sometimes through the nearest blue-light station—that alerts campus security officials. (Associated Press, 4/14/05)

•The Department of Education is considering a plan to maintain files on virtually every college and university student in the country: 15 million students from 6,000 schools. Supporters say the national student database would improve the tracking of graduation rates and help measure quality in higher education. Opponents warn against privacy issues and identity theft. (The Kansas City Star, 4/13/05)

•Rather than eliminate the Greek system, Colgate University is buying all Greek houses. The purchases were recommended by a task force formed after a drunk-driving incident left four dead and the driver in prison for vehicular manslaughter. Any Greek organization that retains ownership of its property will lose university recognition. (CNN.com/Associated Press, 4/13/05)

•Four North Carolina lawmakers have introduced legislation that would let children of illegal immigrants pay in-state rates if they've attended the state's public schools for four years, graduated from a state high school and met other criteria, such as admission to a state university. Nine states have passed similar legislation and at least 16 other states have considered it, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. (The Charlotte Observer, 4/13/05)