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This Week in Higher Ed

•Web logs, or blogs, are morphing into the next big thing on campus: wikis. The wiki, which gets its name from the Hawaiian word for "quick," is an interactive Web page that can be changed by anyone who stumbles upon it. While blogs let people publish their thoughts online, wikis take things a step further, creating freewheeling, collaborative communities: Students can edit one another's work, bounce ideas around or link to infinite other Web sites. (The Washington Post, 3/11/05)
•Web logs, or blogs, are morphing into the next big thing on campus: wikis. The wiki, which gets its name from the Hawaiian word for "quick," is an interactive Web page that can be changed by anyone who stumbles upon it. While blogs let people publish their thoughts online, wikis take things a step further, creating freewheeling, collaborative communities: Students can edit one another's work, bounce ideas around or link to infinite other Web sites. (The Washington Post, 3/11/05)

•Concerned about the skyrocketing cost of tuition at Texas universities, Senate budget writers approved a proposal that would penalize schools unable to contain costs. The Senate Finance Committee voted to dock state universities that charged tuition of more than $94 for a semester hour. Tuition has jumped by as much as 40 percent at some state universities, including the University of Texas at Austin, in the two years since the legislature removed tuition caps. Public universities would lose a dollar in state funding for every dollar in tuition charged over the $94-a-semester limit. (San Antonio Express News, 3/10/05)

•The University of Colorado's governing board has instructed school attorneys to try to negotiate the resignation of controversial professor Ward Churchill. The tenured ethnic studies professor ignited a firestorm with an essay he wrote that likened some 9/11 victims to Nazi bureaucrat Adolf Eichmann. (Rocky Mountain News/Associated Press, 3/10/05)

•Harvard Business School will reject 119 applicants who followed a hacker's instructions and peeked into the school's admission site to see if they had been accepted, according to Dean Kim Clark. Carnegie Mellon's Tepper School of Business also has said it will reject those proven to have tried to peek at their files. (MSNBC, 3/9/05)

•A Texas Senate subcommittee on higher education estimates that fifth- and sixth-year students at the state's public universities are costing taxpayers $29.4 million. (WOIA.com/Associated Press, 3/9/05)

•In an editorial, Philip G. Altbach writes on the dangers of "naming rights" that have proliferated in American higher education. He says, “ … in a few cases where professional schools have established reputations, wealthy alumni and entrepreneurial leadership, it is possible to build an identity separate from the university … The trends we see now … will inevitably weaken the concept of the university as an institution that is devoted to the search for truth and the transmission of knowledge, of an institution with almost a millennium of history. The naming frenzy is symbolic of the commercialization, bifurcation, and entrepreneurialism of the contemporary university.” (The Christian Science Monitor, 3/9/05)

•In forensic sciences and related courses, colleges nationwide still are using the BTK serial murders as a learning tool. At universities where students were asked to profile the killer, the students have the unique opportunity to make presentations on how well their profile matched newly-arrested suspect Dennis Rader. (Associated Press, 3/9/05)