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This Week in Higher Ed

•A North Dakota legislator has introduced a bill that would require colleges and universities in North Dakota to be sure foreign instructors can communicate clearly in English. The bill also would force schools to reimburse class fees for any student who submits a complaint about an instructor's lack of communication skills. If 10 percent of the students in a class submitted such complaints, the instructor would be removed from teaching pending further review. (Kansas City Infozine, 2/14/05)
•A North Dakota legislator has introduced a bill that would require colleges and universities in North Dakota to be sure foreign instructors can communicate clearly in English. The bill also would force schools to reimburse class fees for any student who submits a complaint about an instructor's lack of communication skills. If 10 percent of the students in a class submitted such complaints, the instructor would be removed from teaching pending further review. (Kansas City Infozine, 2/14/05)

•More public universities are requiring students to have health insurance before they step into the classroom. Surveys indicate that anywhere from 10 to 30 percent of students are uninsured. College officials are finding that some of these students are forced to drop out when faced with medical expenses. (Associated Press, 2/14/05)

•The American Council on Education and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation have called on colleges to make the traditional academic career path more family-friendly and flexible. Among the policy changes proposed: better childcare and allowing women with young children more time to complete research before being evaluated for tenure. (USA Today, 2/14/05)

•Designing a Web site aimed at teens? Expert Jacob Nielsen says to make the text big (teens like to lean back at their computers), include interactive elements (i.e. message boards, polls, quizzes and the ability to ask questions of experts) and use plenty of photos or images. For the complete story, visit http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,66514,00.html?tw=wn_tophead_4. (Wired, 2/10/05)

•Young adults value college, but many haven't enrolled because of money woes, poor preparation, low expectations at home or sheer laziness, a survey finds. Seven in 10 say they are in their jobs by chance, not by choice (CNN, 2/10/05)

•A Kentucky legislator has introduced a bill that would prevent public universities from enrolling students who can't prove citizenship. (Lexington Herald-Leader, 2/10/05)

•Nationwide, college endowments rose an average of 15 percent last year, according to the National Association of College and University Business Officers. (The San Diego Union Tribune, 2/9/05)

•According to the American Association of Community Colleges, about 65 percent of their survey respondents reviewed or modified their curriculum in response to increased homeland security training needs. The association sent surveys to 1,100 community colleges and 344 responded. (The Kansas City Star, 2/9/05)

•Since the terrorist attacks of 2001, Chinese enrollment is down 22 percent, largely due to delays in issuing student visas. However, changes are underway. The State Department has shrunk the average waiting period from two months to two weeks and stopped requiring new security checks for Chinese students visiting home within a year of enrolling. (Newsday/Associated Press, 2/9/05)

•Female high school students consistently outperform males in reading and writing, have higher educational aspirations than their male peers and are more likely to enroll in college the fall immediately following graduation from high school, according to the recent report “Trends in Educational Equity of Girls and Women: 2004” from the U.S. Department of Education. (BriefCASE, Feb. 2005)