Go back

This Week in Higher Ed

•Faced with state budget cuts and the pressure of competition, public universities are focusing on students as young as freshmen and sophomores as prime targets for fundraising campaigns. At California State Polytechnic University, undergrads give to a students-only scholarship fund. The University of Georgia solicits seniors to donate around $35 for campus improvements. At Auburn University, colleges within the university are asking students to make contributions in the amount of their class year–$20.05 for 2005, for example. (The Boston Globe/Associated Press, 2/7/05)
•Faced with state budget cuts and the pressure of competition, public universities are focusing on students as young as freshmen and sophomores as prime targets for fundraising campaigns. At California State Polytechnic University, undergrads give to a students-only scholarship fund. The University of Georgia solicits seniors to donate around $35 for campus improvements. At Auburn University, colleges within the university are asking students to make contributions in the amount of their class year—$20.05 for 2005, for example. (The Boston Globe/Associated Press, 2/7/05)

•According to The Princeton Review, the 10 colleges with the happiest students are: 1) Pomona College, William Jewell College (Liberty, Mo.), Stanford, New College of Florida, Dartmouth, Carleton College (Northfield, Minn.), Brigham Young, Whitman College (Walla Walla, Wash.), University of Tulsa (Tulsa, Okla.) and Wheaton College (Wheaton, Ill.). (MSN.com, 2/3/05)

•Two democrats on the U.S. House Education and Workforce Committee called for hearings on non-profit colleges, following a Jan. 30 report on “60 Minutes” that raised questions about fraud. The segment claimed Career Education Corp. would coax unqualified students to enroll with promises of high-paying jobs and high job-placement rates. Students took on financial aid but were never given the career assistance they had been promised. (Chicago Tribune, 2/2/05)

•College textbook prices increased nearly four times the rate of inflation over the last decade, and the average undergraduate spends nearly $900 a year on books, according to a survey by the State Public Interest Research Groups. The study, called “Rip-off 101,” also found that publishers routinely charge American students more than overseas students for the same books, and publishers regularly update textbooks with minor changes, then force students to pay an average of 45 percent more for the new edition. (The Star-Ledger, 2/2/05)

•Texas legislators have filed a proposal that would end repeal the state's top 10 percent rule, which guarantees state university admission to students in the top 10 percent of their graduating classes. (San Antonio Express-News, 2/2/05)