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This Week in Higher Ed

•At colleges across the country, the gender imbalance has been growing steadily for decades, and college admissions officers say they can't stand by and watch the schools become mostly female bastions. Instead, they are reaching out to high school boys through direct marketing and phone calls from recruiters and male professors. And in a yet-to-be-released study, liberal arts colleges acknowledge admitting less-qualified boys to balance enrollment. (The Arizona Republic/The Record, 1/26/05)
•At colleges across the country, the gender imbalance has been growing steadily for decades, and college admissions officers say they can't stand by and watch the schools become mostly female bastions. Instead, they are reaching out to high school boys through direct marketing and phone calls from recruiters and male professors. And in a yet-to-be-released study, liberal arts colleges acknowledge admitting less-qualified boys to balance enrollment. (The Arizona Republic/The Record, 1/26/05)

•New York Gov. George E. Pataki has proposed giving colleges $500 for each student who earns a bachelor's degree in four years and $250 for each student who earns an associate's degree in two years. The incentive plan, called the Partnership to Accelerate Completion Time, is aimed at reducing the money students and taxpayers spend on higher education. (The New York Times, 1/26/05)

•Artists Chris Burden and Nancy Rubins retired abruptly from their longtime professorships at UCLA in part because the university refused to suspend a graduate student who used a gun during a classroom performance art piece. The performance involved a simulation of Russian roulette. (Los Angeles Times, 1/25/05)

•Mississippi legislators have filed a Senate bill that, if passed, will give the state's Commission on College Accreditation the power to ask online universities to apply for accreditation or leave. (Sun Herald, 1/25/05)

•A computer hard drive missing from the University of Northern Colorado contained personal information on possibly more than 30,000 thousands of employees and their families—including names, birth dates, Social Security numbers and bank account numbers. (Houston Chronicle/Associated Press, 1/25/05)