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This week in higher ed

•The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit invalidated the 10-year-old Solomon Amendment that requires universities to give campus access to military recruiters or forfeit federal funding. The decision was the first to hold that the law violated universities free-speech rights under the First Amendment. (The Philadelphia Inquirer, 11/30/04)

•Black colleges are finding a new market in appealing to Latino students. From 1976 to 2001, the number of Latino students enrolled in black colleges has nearly doubled. (The Boston Globe, 11/30/04)
•The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit invalidated the 10-year-old Solomon Amendment that requires universities to give campus access to military recruiters or forfeit federal funding. The decision was the first to hold that the law violated universities' free-speech rights under the First Amendment. (The Philadelphia Inquirer, 11/30/04)

•Black colleges are finding a new market in appealing to Latino students. From 1976 to 2001, the number of Latino students enrolled in black colleges has nearly doubled. (The Boston Globe, 11/30/04)

•Clemson University was forced to increase meal prices nearly 3 percent, thanks to the low-carb craze, which has students choosing more meat. (CNN, 11/24/04)

•Corinthian Colleges Inc. and Florida Metropolitan University Online are suing two former employees for discouraging prospective students from enrolling in its academic programs. (The Orange County Register, 11/24/04)

•According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, young adults (18-24) are the only age group in which smoking rates have risen in the past decade. As many as 30 percent of college students smoke. (Gannett News Service, 11/24/04)

•More students are reporting bouts of depression and anxiety, and suicide attempts are up on college campuses. Many colleges are scrambling to find more manpower and money to serve and retain students during what one expert terms a “campus mental health crisis.” (Maine Today, 11/23/04)

•Donations by minorities are gaining attention and clout. In the New York metro region, a recent study of 166 donors of color found that their average charitable giving in the past year was significantly higher than the average for all donors. (The Christian Science Monitor, 11/23/04)

•The growing gender gap is testing college admissions as schools rush to enroll top high school students—who are overwhelmingly female. Administrators are watching closely for the “tipping point” at which schools become appealing because of lopsided male-female ratios. (Los Angeles Times, 11/23/04)

•At institutions with a high proportion of first-generation college students, many from less-affluent families, undergrads tend to be less confident and less prepared, As a result, large numbers of freshman fail to return for their second year. To promote retention, universities are doing things like establishing “freshman connection” programs to make large schools seem more intimate, asking the entire freshman class to read the same book, building dorms with more space for social activities, developing seminar programs and taking students who live in the same residence hall and enrolling them into introductory courses together. (USA Today, 11/22/04)