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This week in higher ed

•The number of foreign graduate students enrolling for the first time at U.S. universities is down 6 percent this year–the third straight decline after a decade of growth. (The Mercury News/Associated Press, 11/8/04)

•The University of New Hampshire dropped three of the four charges against a sophomore who hung posters in his dorm suggesting freshman girls could lose weight by taking the stairs. The charges of harassment, disorderly or lewd conduct and affirmative action violations have been thrown out. (Concord Monitor, 11/5/04)
•The number of foreign graduate students enrolling for the first time at U.S. universities is down 6 percent this year—the third straight decline after a decade of growth. (The Mercury News/Associated Press, 11/8/04)

•The University of New Hampshire dropped three of the four charges against a sophomore who hung posters in his dorm suggesting freshman girls could lose weight by taking the stairs. The charges of harassment, disorderly or lewd conduct and affirmative action violations have been thrown out. (Concord Monitor, 11/5/04)

•Voter turnout among 18- to 29-year-olds jumped by 9.3 percent over the level in 2000 for the 2004 presidential election. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 11/4/04)

•Marcus Parker, the victim of a 2001 hazing at the hands of Florida A&M University marching band members, won a $1.8 million verdict in his civil battery case. He sued five of those charged with beating him so severely with a paddling board that he suffered kidney failure. (Tallahassee Democrat, 11/4/04)

•The Hinman Campus Entrepreneurship Opportunities program at the University of Maryland, the first residential entrepreneurship program in the country, offers students the opportunity to live in special dorms that double as offices. A similar program at Oregon State University keeps two guest suites for entrepreneurs who lecture, provide informal mentoring and spend the night on campus. (Christian Science Monitor, 11/3/04)

•Since the creation of the master's in business administration, it has been criticized for having little relevance to real life. But today, applications into traditional MBA programs have plateaued, while part-time programs are flourishing, and classes for middle managers are booming. Get the story here: http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/1102/p11s02-legn.htm. (Christian Science Monitor, 11/2/04)