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This week in higher ed

•Increasingly, white students are enrolling at the nation's 120 historically black colleges and universities. Some, such as West Virginia State University and Lincoln University of Missouri, are now majority-white. Others, struggling to meet court mandates for more white students, are using scholarship money to lure students from as far away as Russia. (The Washington Post, 11/1/04)
•Increasingly, white students are enrolling at the nation's 120 historically black colleges and universities. Some, such as West Virginia State University and Lincoln University of Missouri, are now majority-white. Others, struggling to meet court mandates for more white students, are using scholarship money to lure students from as far away as Russia. (The Washington Post, 11/1/04)

•Despite record numbers of high school graduates, state universities around the country are reporting a decline in the number of African-American freshmen, in some cases by the hundreds, puzzling admissions officers and university officials. (Chicago Tribune, 11/1/04)

•Are men becoming an endangered species on college campuses? The Learning Resources Network estimates that only 35 percent of today's undergrads are men, down from 50 percent in 1980 and 43 percent in 2001. (The Arizona Republic, 11/1/04)

•A national survey conducted by the Council of Graduate Schools says admissions of international students at 125 universities fell an average of 18 percent in the last year. The students most affected were from Islamic countries, China, India, South Korea and Israel. (The New York Times, 10/29/04)

•College students who participate in religious activities are more likely to have better emotional and mental health than students with no religious involvement, according to a national survey of students at 46 colleges and universities. (USA Today, 10/28/04)

•Over the past 30 years, the number of black college graduates majoring in engineering has increased from less than 2 percent to more than 12 percent. (Stamats newsletter, 10/27/04)

•Mississippi's Ayers case is among decades-old lawsuits in 11 states winding down with historically black universities receiving money for construction, scholarships and academic programs. The U.S. Supreme Court ended Mississippi's 30-year-old case last week by refusing to hear an additional appeal. Louisiana's case could wrap next year, while Tennessee's case—the first filed in the nation—could be decided in 2006. (The Clarion-Ledger, 10/26/04)