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This week in higher ed

•The Princeton Review has named the nations 25 most connected campuses–the ones that support wireless networking, provide high-speed connections to classrooms and stream video of classes over the Internet. The top five are Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Bryant University, DePauw University, Temple University and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. (Forbes, 10/22/04)
•The Princeton Review has named the nation's 25 most connected campuses—the ones that support wireless networking, provide high-speed connections to classrooms and stream video of classes over the Internet. The top five are Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Bryant University, DePauw University, Temple University and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. (Forbes, 10/22/04)

•Seven years ago, the Texas legislature passed the “Top 10” law, guaranteeing admission at any public university in the states to students who finish in the top 10 percent of their class. Today, those “Top 10” percenters make up two-thirds of the freshman class in Texas universities, and parents are transferring their children to less competitive high schools to improve their odds of graduating in the top 10 percent. (60 Minutes, 10/17/04)

•The national Posse Foundation, which emphasizes leadership skills, is finding colleges willing to accept 10 to 12 students from the same metropolitan area as a tightly bonded group, or “posse.” There are now 753 Posse students in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Boston on 19 U.S. campuses. (The Washington Post, 10/18/04)

•The University of Texas at Austin—the nation's largest campus since 1997—has fallen to No. 3 in enrollment. Now, it trails the University of Minnesota (50,954) and Ohio State University (50,731). UT-Austin, which has 50,403 students, is trying to decrease its enrollment to 48,000 over the next five years. (Houston Chronicle, 10/15/04)