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This week in higher ed

•Despite student protests, Wells College, one of the countrys oldest womens liberal arts colleges, will become coed in Fall 2005. (Newsday, 10/4/04)

•A federal judge has ruled that Texas Techs special free speech zones were restrictive and violated students First and Fourteenth Amendment rights. (The Dallas Morning News, 10/4/04)
•Despite student protests, Wells College, one of the country's oldest women's liberal arts colleges, will become coed in Fall 2005. (Newsday, 10/4/04)

•A federal judge has ruled that Texas Tech's special free speech zones were restrictive and violated students' First and Fourteenth Amendment rights. (The Dallas Morning News, 10/4/04)

•Plans for more college tuition hikes have thrown off the financial equation for Georgia state officials who thought they'd solved the HOPE Scholarship's money problems. Now, they're wondering whether the hikes will force them to revisit a program they just reformed during the 2004 legislative session. (The Atlanta Journal Constitution, 10/4/04)

•Nationwide, schools are opening minority scholarships, fellowships, academic support programs and summer enrichment classes to students of all races. The change follows last year's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that race can be considered in admissions but only among other factors and that each candidate must be evaluated individually. (The Kansas City Star, 10/4/04)

•The Bush administration has denied entry to all 61 Cuban scholars who were scheduled to participate in the Latin American Studies Association's international congress, deeming them “detrimental to the interests of the United States.” Leading American academics called it an unprecedented effort to sever scholarly exchanges that have been conducted since 1979. (The New York Times, 10/1/04)

•Congress is trying to end a practice that unintentionally has allowed banks to take in billions of dollars meant to help students pay for college. Lenders are profiting from a promise the government made in 1980 to encourage college loans: a guaranteed return of 9.5 percent on those loans financed by tax-exempt bonds. The government must pay lenders the interest that is not covered by students. With interest rates now as low as 3.4 percent, making up the difference has become a budget nightmare. (Chicago Tribune, 10/1/04)

•Florida A&M President Fred Gainous is on the way out, but the university's accounting problem will remain. A Florida auditor has tagged the school for failing to track banking records, issuing contracts without seeking competitive bids, failing to pay vendors and not monitoring student aid programs. (The Miami Herald, 9/30/04)

•More families are buying insurance that covers tuition if a student has to leave school unexpectedly. Emory University, which started offering the product last year, saw a 33 percent increase this year. (The Wall Street Journal, 9/29/04)